THEATRE ARTS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

          THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT

Africa Curiculum

NATIONALLY HARMONIZED CURRICULUM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A) DEGREE IN THEATRE ARTS

Participants

                                     1. AbonehAshagrie………………….Addis Ababa university

2.MisganawAlemu………………Mekelle university

3.AddisalemAschalew………….Wollo University

4.DanielBekure………………….Mekelle university

5.YonasHailu……………………Wollo university

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

August23, 2013

Background of the program

 Theatre arts activities are emanated from the people .Theater is a communal activity where   one    or  more people act out a story for an audience ,so it is fair to suggest  that theater can  trace its roots back to the religious ritual of prehistoric human kind. In short, the historical background tends to ritual and secular activity. Modern theatre practice puts its step stone in Greece. After time t o time the point of view of theater is broad in multi dimension .Different scholars annotated the meaning but no one put out the same. At last, different scholars depicted that Theater arts not only the reflection of the real world but also the reverse is true.

 In the context of Ethiopia, the starting point of modern theatre arts is about 1900 E.c. by a play called “ያውሬወችኮሜዲያመሳለቂያ/fabulla” which is written by fitawurari/bejirondTekleHawaryatTekleMaryam.In fact until the rigime of H/Silasse it had not explained at the right way.  It was not professional performance. For example, foreigner teachers practiced at school level, but not well organized.

       After the withdrawal of Italians, theatre houses were built & some dramatists got an opportunity for theatre education scholarship. The reflections of professionalism signed specially, at the time 1960s. 

    Theatre arts are combinations of art and science. However, in Ethiopia, the common understanding of the people at the previous time different from that. Therefore, to change this misperception; it was necessary to launch the program at Addis Ababa university 1971 E.c. On the other hand the purpose of the program was to create awareness and cope up the profession as it is.

       Since 1974, students were graduating at Addis Ababa University in the field of theatre arts. They were giving a lot of contribution for theatre arts profession as well.  On the other hand in 2002 E.c(Mekelle),2004E.c,(Wollo)2005E.c(wulkitte)universities opened B.A program in Theatre Arts respectively.

Rationale

The drastic transformation of international developmental communication strategy has changed the set of skills needed for success in the field of Theatre Arts and Film industry in the global work place.

 At this time in Ethiopia, the chronic shortage of theatre professionals, the absent of film school, the uncertainty of the digital feature , above all the country’s current  intricate and multifaceted socio-cultural and socio-economic problem has made the field more difficult than ever. Non professional and functional knowledge are no longer sufficient .Competitive professionals skilled through truly integrated training that marry international level art education and media industry requirement are needed.

Moreover, as it is known Ethiopia is in struggle to meet the millennium development goal, stage theatre and electronic media’s drama will play a   great role as developmental tool through its unlimited power for collective social change. Generally,  as a means to eradicate poverty and to bring sustainable development through Theatre Arts and new media’s drama , professionals  are needed now than ever.Therefore, it is a necessary condition for ministry of Education to open the Department of Theatre Arts in different universities of the country.

3.Program Learning outcomes

3.1. General Learning outcomes:

The general Learning outcomesof themodularized BA program in theatre arts are:

 ·        Train theatre artists for playhouse and the mass media;

·        Train theatre professionals: dramatists, actors, directors, dramatic critics and junior researchers in the field of theatre arts; and

·      Train theatre   and literary experts who can serve as promoters of drama and literature.

   3.2. Specific Learning outcomes

·   Training translators of dramatic works;

·   Preparing conferences on dramatic and literary productions;

·providing capacity building schemes to theatre professionals and amateur artists; and

·   enhancing the artistic and cultural awareness of the University community in general          and of the University students in particular;

·   Training entertainment journalists

2 .Professional Profile

The theatre art professional is expected to have the following skills and responsibilities

  • Conducts research in the areas of theatre arts and electronic media dramas.
  • Conduct research on traditional performing arts.
  • Presents theatre production;
  • Make a film in an international production industry’s requirement.
  • Manage skills in theatre and film productions.
  • Organizes and facilitates workshops, seminars, and festivals;
  • Criticizes, analyses and reviews TV, radio, and stage dramas;
  • Continues professional development, updated in the field, and assimilate knowledge and skills for others.
  • At lefileast more than graduate pro
  1. Graduate Profile

A graduate of Theatre Arts Department is expected to be able to:

  • Write plays for stage;radio drama; screen media;
  • Direct plays for stage;Radio drama;screen media;
  • Acts on stage;for radio;screen plays;
  • Conductresearches in the areas of theatre,film, television&radio drama;
  • Evaluate and appreciate scripts as well as productions;
  • Conduct training on theatre,film, television& radio drama
  • Produce stage theatre,film,  television &radio drama
  • Translate and adapt plays;
  • Produce and broadcast theatre and screen productions for mass media; and
  • Prepare workshop on basic steps of Ethiopian traditional dance,children&youth theatre
  1. PROGRAM PROFILE
  • Duration of the study

The program takes four years with eight successive semesters for students to complete their study.

  • Admission requirements

Students admitted directly from secondary school are required to meet the national higher education enrolment criteria of that year. Students placed to the college of social sciences and humanities can join the program on competitive base, and  the department  should prove students talent through audition and written examination.

  • Graduation Requirements

Students registered in the Department must take a total of 240  ECTS. A student is required to have a minimum CGPA of 2.00 upon graduation without any Fx and F grade in any of the modules/courses.

  • Degree Nomenclature

Upon graduation, students shall be offered a Bachelor of Arts (B.A) Degree in Theatre Arts. The degree nomenclature in Amharic shall be“የአርትባቸለርድግሪ በ ትያትርጥበባት”.

  • Quality Assurance

Internal audit as per the guideline set by the university will be employed to follow up the learning- teaching process and to control the quality of the outcome.

  • Method of Assessment and Evaluation Mechanisms

As per the nationally harmonized academic policy, 50% of the course assessment will be generated from continuous assessment (at least 4-5 continuous assessment methods) and the remaining 50% shall be for the final examination. The continuous assessment methods as per the course nature include test, assignment, performance, presentation,  quiz.

Grading Scale and LetterGrade System for Ethiopian Public Universities

Raw Mark Interval-[100 %] Corresponding Fixe d NumberGrade Corresponding LetterGrade Status Description Class Description
[90,100] 4.0 A+ Excellent Firstclass withGreatdistinction  
[85, 90) 4.0 A
[80, 85) 3.75 A-
[75, 80) 3.5 B+ VeryGood Firstclasswith   Distinction
[70, 75) 3.0 B
  [65, 70)   2.75   B- Good Firstclass
[60, 65) 2.5 C+ Second Class
[50, 60) 2.0 C Satisfactory
[45, 50) 1.75 C Unsatisfactory LowerClass
[40,45) 1.0 D VeryPoor LowerClass
[30,40) 0 Fx *Fail LowestClass
[<30) 0 F Fail Lowest Class

Remarks

  1. A student cannot graduate with a grade of less than 2.00 out of the 4-scale grading system. Therefore, he/she should at least score a minimum of a C grade and above which is 50% of the competency.
  2. A student with ‘C‘can pass to the next semester if it is first semester period and it increases with level/year of students. A student with a good stand can graduate if he/she scores ‘C‘ in any course under module. However, if the ‘C‘grade is for a Module or for a course as a module, he/she must re-sit for another exam to remove ‘C‘.
  3. A student with all ‘Ds’ cannot pass to the next semester. A student with a good stand can pass to the next semester and even can graduate if he/she scores D in any course under module. However, if the ‘D’ grade is for a Module or for a course as a module, he/she must re-sit for another exam to remove ‘D’.
  4. A student with Fx must sit re-exam with minor support for two times and the grade will be any of what a student can score.
  5. A student with F must repeat the course/module  for two times and the grade will be any of what a student can score.

7. MODULE PROFILE

  • Module and course code assignment

Major area modules and courses of the program are represented by ThAr respectively. The codes for the courses are represented by 4 digits. The first digit indicates year of study, the middle two digits refer to module number and the last digit stands for sequence of a course in a module.

  • Mode of Delivery

The general modes of module/course delivery to be utilized in the program are mainly block and parallel. Moreover, the mode of delivery for each course is mentioned in the course breakdown.

  • Method of teaching

The program of Theatre Arts mainly utilizes the student centered approach in its learning-teaching activities. Depending on the nature of the module/course, teaching modalities such as lecture, group work and discussion ,stage performance, screen performance, fieldwork , critical review of papers, term paper works, and presentations will be employed in the learning -teaching process.

  • Module/Course Policy

As per article 54 of the nationally harmonized academic policy, the following components of the article will be considered as course policy.

  1. A student is required to attend all lecture sessions as well as field work of modules/courses. Except for extenuating circumstances, students are required to maintain a minimum of 80% attendance to earn credit in the given course. However, some modules/courses may demand 100% attendance where such full attendance is academically indispensable.
  1. In addition, a student is expected to actively participate in the class discussions, perform all tasks directed by the course/module instructor, report individual and group home take assignments on time.

Resource requirement

Materialresource                                                                                                                 

Conducting Theatre arts education without Theatrical  material is unthinkable. due to this, forthe successful running of the program  the following human and material  resource are  basic to  open the program at any universities.

  • Modern theatre stage with its full stage properties.                                                                          
  • different kind  of  video camera, video deck, television, lights, tape recorders, sound equipments, traditional and modern costumes, make ups, carpets, household materials and furniture,stageproperties,castels(dicorations),hammers,sows,nails,ladders,rooms,puppets,cartoons,woods,paints,brushes and masks etc.
  • Books, journals, articles, periodicals, proceedings,
  • LCD projectors
  • Laptop computers
  • Classrooms, Offices for the department and staff, meeting rooms, department library
  • Office furniture
  • Field equipment
  • Resource center(Store)

                    Human Resource

  • Instructors, Secretaries ,  store keepers , technicians


  • MODULE/COURSE BREAKDOWN

                                   Table-1

Year SEMESTER MODULE CODE MODULE NAME MODULE EtCTS COURSE                CODE LIST OF COURSES COURSE CATAGORY EtCTS
 I          I           M-ThAr1011 Survey of Theatre 15 ThAr1012  Survey of world theatre Core 5
ThAr1013 Theatre in Africa Core 5
ThAr1014 Survey of Ethiopian Theatre Core 5
M-ThAr1021 Acting 10 ThAr1022 Fundamentals of Acting Core 5
ThAr1023 Advance Acting Core                                                               5
    5   communicative English General       5
 II M-ThAr1031 Playwriting 20 ThAr1032  Dramatic Technique Core 5
ThAr1033 Writing for Stage Core 5
ThAr1034 Writing for Screen Core 5
ThAr1035 Writing for Radio Core 5  
    5   IT General 5
    5   Writing Skill General 5

Table-2

Year Semester MODULE CODE MODULE NAME MODULE EtCTS COURSE CODE LIST OF COURSES COURSE CATAGORY EtCTS
II           I           M-ThAr2011           Production Design & Technology     10 ThAr2012   Scene & light Core 5
ThAr2013   Sound, costume, prop& makeup Core 5
    5     Civic & ethical education General 5
M-ThAr2021   Directing 15 ThAr2022   Directing for stage Core 5
ThAr2023   Directing for Electronics media Core 5
ThAr2024   Directing practicum Core 5
II   M-ThAr2031   Art Appreciation 20 ThAr2032 Aesthetics Core 5
ThAr2033   Basics of Painting Core 5
ThAr2034   Basics of music Core 5
ThAr2035   Basics of dance Core 5
M-ThAr2041   Art management & Entrepreneurship 10 ThAr2042   Art Management Core 5
ThAr2043   Entrepreneurship Core 5

Table-3

Year SEMESTER MODULE CODE MODULE NAME MODULE EtCTS Course code LIST OF COURSES COURSE CATAGORY EtCTS
III   I                     M-ThAr3011   Theatre specials 20 ThAr3012   Musical Theatre Core 5
ThAr3013   Youth & children theatre Core 5
ThAr3014   Traditional drama Core 5
ThAr3015   Theatre for development Core 5
    5   Logic General     5
    5   Psychology General 5
II M-ThAr3021   Dramatic criticism 15   ThAr3022     Theory of criticism Core 5
ThAr3023   Critical reading Core 5
ThAr3024   Critical analysis of Productions Core 5
M-ThAr3031   Dramaturgy 15 ThAr3032   Practice of Dramaturge Core 5
ThAr3033   Research Core 5
ThAr3034   Translation Core 5

Table -4

Year Semester MODULE CODE MODULE NAME MODULE EtCTS Course code   LIST OF COURSES COURSE CATAGORY EtCTS
  IV       I   M-ThAr4011   Public communication 15 ThAr4012   Mass communication Core 5
ThAr4013   Public attachment core 10
M-ThAr4021   Senior Essay/ project   15   ThAr4021       Core 15
II M-ThAr4031   Productions 30 ThAr4032   Stage play Core 15
ThAr4033   Television & Film productions Core 10
ThAr4034   Radio production Core 5

THATER SURVEY MODULE PROFILE

Module Name Survey of theatre
Module Code M-Thar 1011
Clustered Course Name Survey of world theatre ThAr 1012 Survey of African Theatre  ThAr1013 Survey of Ethiopian theatre ThAr 1014
ECTS 15
Total Module Study Hour  hours

II. Module Description

This module comprises   of three theoretical courses. namely: survey of world theatre, survey of African theatre and survey of Ethiopian theatre as the name by itself indicates, this courses discusses all historical background of theatre and their development still now.

III. Module Objectives

After successful completion of  this module, students will be familiar with the historical development of world, African and Ethiopian theatre.   

IV. Competency

After studying this course students will be able to

  • Clearly identify the origin of theatre
  • Describe theatre structure of each period
  • Elaborate the popular practitioners of theatre
  • Understand the different country theatre there writing script styles and performance
  • Know historical background of African Theatre
  • Know the effect of ritual ceremonies for African Theater
  • Be  familiar with different African theater writers  and their works
  • Know how, where and by whom modern theatre started in Ethiopia
  • Know the people( Ethiopian and non- Ethiopian) and their history who played a great role in modern Ethiopian theatre
  • Know the theatre houses and their history well, as well as their roles in the modern Ethiopian theatre
  • Know some vocational, social and political conditions that had a great effect in the modern Ethiopian theatre
  • Know the significance of school theatres in modern Ethiopian theatre

COURSE SYLLABUS/ COURSE GUIDE

   Survey of world theatre (ThAr 1012)

I.  Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

This course deals with the beginning of Theatre arts and its development from ancient Greece to the contemporary world. It focuses on the main historical incidents throughout theatre history. Introduce those renowned theatre practitioners of different countries and their work of art.     

II. Objectives of the course

This course is designed to introduce students with history of world theatre from its classical period to the contemporary world. It also focuses the major theatrical movements, styles, structure and practitioners of theatre chronologically.

III. Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for  lectures, 30 hours for  group and individual assignments, 20 hours for  problem solving sessions and assessment and 55 hours for independent study.

IV. Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to

  • Clearly identify the origin of theatre
  • Describe theatre structure of each period
  • Elaborate the popular practitioners of theatre
  • Understand the different country theatre there writing script styles and performance

V. Contents

Section one: classical theatre

This is the introductory part of theatre history. They include origin of theatre, imitations and rituals, Egyptian’s Abydos passion play and Greek theatre: origin and development. Tragedians, tragic structure

Section two: Medieval theatre. The history tends to more of religious and morality plays. For instance, liturgical drama (mystery, miracle and morality plays) have been covered.

Section three: Asian theatre. An over view historical theatre background for Asian (far eastern countries) such as: Indian theatre, China theatre and Japan theatre.

Section four: Re-birth of theatre. This part concentrates on renaissance theatre, including in English Elizabethan theatre, Spanish golden age theatre and French the Neo-classical theatre.

 Section five: restoration theatre. During the restoration times that facilitate and lead theatre activity are: England, French, and Germany.

Section six: Modern theatre. After the 18th century in theatre history that begins modern theatre movement, styles and structures.

VI. Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 10%
  • Assignment  one =10%
  • Test(2) =20%
  • Quiz =10%
  •  Final  Exam=50%

         Total =100%

Reading Materials

Wilson, Edwin and Alvin Goldfarb. Living theatre. (2000)

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Theatre in Africa (ThAr 1013)

1 .Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

The course focuses on Pre-colonial, colonial and post–colonial African theatre. The traditional, religious and secular African theatre forms.

  1. Objective of the course

This course aims to offer a broad history of theatre in Africa, covering the entire continent. The course will also discuss the theatrical periods of African countries during pre-colonial era, colonial era and post-colonial era. The course will allow students to read various African plays. The course include an examination of the concepts of theatre histories in Africa; North Africa; Francophone theatre; Anglophone West Africa; East Africa; Southern Africa;; Mauritius and Reunion; and the African Diaspora among others.

  1.  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  1. Learning Outcomes

After finalizing this course students will be able to analyze African plays. In addition students will have full information about pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial theatrical activities of Africa. Students will also know theatrical styles of African playwrights which are critical for their upcoming endeavors of writing plays.

  1. Course Contents

Part One

  • Concepts of history and theatre in Africa
  • North Africa
  • Francophone Africa South of the Sahara
  • Anglophone West Africa
  • East Africa
  • Southern Africa
  • Theatre in Portuguese speaking African countries
  • Mauritius and Reunion
  • Surviving the crossing: theatre in the African diaspora

Part Two

  • African theatre in the pre-colonial era
  • African theatre in the colonial era
  • African theatre in the post-colonial era
  1. Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Attendance ————————————– 10%
  • Term paper ————————————– 30
  • Quiz ———————————————— 20%
  • Final exam —————————————- 40%
  1. Reading Materials

Banham, Martin, Hill, Errol and Woodyard, George,eds. 1994. The Cambridge Guide to African

And Caribbean Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Browning, Barbara, 1998. Infectious Rhythm: Metaphors of Contagion and the Spread of African

Culture. London and New York: Rutledge.

Kanneh, Kadiatu. 1998. African Identities: Race, Nation and Culture in Ethnography, Pan-

Africanism and Black Literatures. London and New York: Rutledge.

Obiechina, Emmanuel. 1986. “Africa in the soul of depressed children: West African literature

From the era of the slave trade.”

Rubin, Don, ed.1997.The world Encyclopedia of contemporary Theatre, vol.3

             Africa, London and New york: Routledge.

Okagbue, Osita.1996.Language and identity in West African and   West Indian Theatre, in

Suzanne stern -Gillet et al.

Banham, A HISTORY OF THEATRE IN AFRICA.  Cambridge University   press.

Various   African   Piays.

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE SYLLABUS/ COURSE GUIDE

  • Survey of Ethiopian  theatre(ThAr 1014)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

The introduction of modern theatre of Ethiopia, School drama, professional playhouses, Creative Arts Center, Department of Theatre Arts, the creative lives and works of known play wrights, actors/actresses, directors, translated plays,, dramatic criticism of Ethiopian Modern Theatre.

Objectives of the course

This course is designed to introduce students with  history of  Ethiopian Theatre from 1900-up to now.  It tries to give knowledge about the places, peoples and conditions where theatre was started in Ethiopia. And also give emphasis for those who had played a great role to bring the modern Ethiopian theatre as it stands today.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The  mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours a?

.Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to

  • Clearly identify the beginning of modern Ethiopian  theatre
  • Describe theatre characteristics of each year.
  • Elaborate the popular practitioners of  modern Ethiopian  theatre
  • Know the historical background of Ethiopian   theatre.

Contents

Section one: The beginning of modern Ethiopian theatre;

Beginning of modern theatre in Ethiopia, their classification based on political, vocational and cultural reasons.

Section two: School drama; School drama and its role, Audience of school drama, Performance place of school drama and People who played a great role in school dramas

  • Melaku begosew
  • Hadisalemyehu
  • Kevorknalbandian

Section three: The historical development of Theater houses and other institutional activities,

           Namely:Hager fikir theatre, Addis Ababa city Administration  theatre and

        culturalhall,Ethiopian national theatre, Ras theatre,children and youth theatre,

          Bahelmaekel, AAU department of theatre arts…etc.

  1. Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 10%
  • Assignment  one =10%
  • Test(2) =20%
  • Quiz =10%
  •  Final  Exam=50%

         Total =100%

Reading Materials

Akalugetaneh: “Comedy and social purpose two plays of mengistulema.”(1981)

Tsegaye g/medihin: “tewodros Ethiopian observer.” (1964)

Debebeseifu: “Ethiopian literature in English.” (1980)

L.kane, Thomas: “Ethiopian literature in Amharic.” (1975)

Gerard, albert: “Four African literature xhosa, sotho, zulu, Amharic.(1971)

MolvareReidulf k. “Black liones the creative lies of modern Ethiopian’s literary giants and pioneers.” (1997)

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

ACTING MODULE

Module Name Acting
Module Code M-ThAr1021
Clustered Course Name Fundamentals of acting ThAr 1022Advanced Acting  ThAr1023
ECTS 10
Total Module Study Hour hours

I. Module Description

This module comprises   of two practical courses. Namely: fundamentals of Acting and advance acting. Both courses clustered under this module designed to   introduce students with basic practical skills, techniques and Art of acting. Thus; relaxation, concentration, imagination, different style of acting…, etc. Enable students to identify and familiar with acting principles, fundamental acting techniques and methodology of acting for stage, radio and screen. Let them to know the approach and philosophy of acting. Train different types of acting. Like; classical acting, method acting…, etc. Introduce them with how they use their body and voice to play their role superbly.

II. Module Objectives

After successful completion of this module, students will get necessary theoretical and operational acting skills. This module is designed, also, to enable them to be professionals in acting for stage, radio, and screen. To let them be an actor and actress who knows different kinds and approaches of acting and give them practical and scientific acting methods.      

III. Competency

  • Understand the definition and key concepts of acting.
  • Appreciate, evaluate and analyze different acting styles.
  • Understand the major theoretical and practical perspectives of acting.
  • Know various acting techniques
  • Familiar with different types of acting and their methodologies.
  • Differentiate and practice various acting principles.
  • Acquaintance with those approaches and philosophies of acting which are practiced on each period of time.

COURSE SYLLABUS/ COURSE GUIDE

  • Fundamentals of Acting(ThAr 1022)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone  no Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

 Course description

 In this course students will acquainted with basic theoretical and practical knowledge of acting; acting history, techniques and styles; prominent acting practitioners and develop group work.     

  Objectives of the course

Overall, this course is devoted to;

. Familiarize students with theoretical and practical knowledge of theatre acting through practical exercise.

.  Introduce with basic elements of acting.

. Enable them to know fundamental techniques of acting for different medium (stage, radio, and screen.)

. Accustom with acting theories and elemental principles of body and voice handling for acting, body gesture and its intention in acting, elements of voice and speech and importance for acting.      

 Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 30 hours for group and individual exercise, 20 hours for lab, 20 hours for problem solving sessions and assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

III. Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to

  • Attain self awareness and confidence on stage performance
  • Know the basic elements of acting
  • define what acting mean
  • familiarize with role playing methodology
  • Understand and implement contemporary techniques of acting.
  • Develop to command their mind and  body easily and coordinately
  • Discover their bodies and voice as performing instruments
  • Have versatile physical and psychological personalities
  • Develop imagination and critical thinking from playing with texts and creating a skit
  • Identify play script rehearsal, improvisation staging and performance
  • Develop tolerance and identify the challenges of theatre production performance

IV. Contents

Section one: Introduction of acting definition, history of acting from the first actor to now. This chapter covers the theoretical aspects of acting skills. Main approaches of acting and well known acting theoreticians throughout its history.

. Acting techniques and methods

.  Types of acting

.  Elements of acting

.  Body and its language

.  Elements of voice and speech

.  Classification of stage and its usage for acting.

. Meaning, definition and responsibility for actors and acting have been covered.

Section two: practical performance on stage. This part includes most of the practical performance on stage such as mental and physical versatility, breathing, voice, setting the stage, composition of the stage and performs drama by improvisation, practical group performance on stage Focused improvisation, group performance, Participation on individual criticism.

V. Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 10%
  • Assignment  =10%
  • Monologue  =10%
  • Solo performance  =1o%
  • Group performance = 10%
  •  Final  Exam(production) =50%

         Total =100%     

Reading Materials

 Boles lavsky, rechard. Acting. (1993)

Berry, cicely. The actor and the text. (1992)  

ብሩክ ከበደ፡፡ የተዋናይ መስታወት፡፡ (1987)

Sebastian jean. Building a character. (1983)

Turner, j.clifford. Voice and speech in the theatre. (1992)

Johanston, keith. Improvisation and the theatre. (1992)

Chekhov, mikeal. To the actor on the technique of acting. (1953)

Cole, toby and Helen krich chinoy. Actors on acting. (1965)

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

Advanced Acting (ThAr 1023)

 Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

II. Course description

The course designed to; (1) introduce students with various styles and types of acting. (2) Provide them practical training of acting and advance them in group performance.

II. Objectives of the course

Overall, this course is devoted to familiarize students with theoretical and practical knowledge of theatre acting, with different styles of acting. Mainly, to provide students difference acting styles theoretical and practical knowledge through practical exercise. Enable them a well trained actor/actress.

III. Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 30 hours for group and individual exercise, 20 hours for lab, 20 hours for problem solving sessions and assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

IV. Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to

  • Attain self awareness and confidence on stage performance
  • Identify different acting styles and their operation.
  • Develop to command their mind and body easily and coordinately for any acting styles.
  • Develop imagination and critical thinking from playing with texts and creating a skit
  • Identify play script rehearsal, improvisation staging and performance
  • Develop tolerance and identify the challenges of theatre production performance

V. Contents

Section one: Different kinds of acting styles. Namely

.classical acting,

. Brechtian acting,

.modern realistic acting

. Presentational acting

. Representational acting and other acting style with their characteristics

. Acting for different genres (tragedy, comedy, musical….) and for different theatre styles (naturalism, realism, epic, absurdist, romanticism …..)

Section two: practical performance of difference acting styles on stage.

VI. Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 10%
  • Assignment   =10%
  • group performance one =15%
  • group performance tow =15%
  •  Final  Exam(production) =50%

         Total =100%     

Reading Materials

 Boles lavsky, rechard. Acting. (1993)

Berry, cicely. The actor and the text. (1992)  

ብሩክ ከበደ፡፡ የተዋናይ መስታወት፡፡ (1987)

Sebastian jean. Building a character. (1983)

Turner, j.clifford. Voice and speech in the theatre. (1992)

Johanston, keith. Improvisation and the theatre. (1992)

Chekhov, mikeal. To the actor on the technique of acting. (1953)

Cole, toby and Helen krich chinoy. Actors on acting. (1965)

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-         

Module Guide for Playwriting

Module Name Playwriting
Module Code M-ThAr1031
Clustered Course Dramatic Tequnique-1032  Writing for Stage-1033Writing for Screen-1034Writing for Radio-1035
ECTS 20
Total Module Study Hour 540 hours (135 hours for each course)

І. Module Description

This module entitled “Playwriting” is made up of four consecutive courses. The courses encompassed in the module are, “Dramatic Techniques”, “Writing for Stage”, “Writing for Screen” and “Writing for Radio”.

The module will provide deep insight on the overall aspects of playwriting for different media. Accordingly the courses in the module are highly interconnected and are strongly supportive for one another.

The module should be finalized in a semester. The courses in the module will be delivered as per the time division of the department (16 weeks). Students shall register no ‘F’ grade in any of the courses in order to carry on the module throughout the semester and attain the best out of each courses.

The module in each of its courses demand writing practicum of different genres in every single medium. And every student is expected to write his/her own original story for stage, screen and radio medium. Hence students will accomplish their first professional scratch on playwriting. In addition this module will provide major theatre styles, the use of punctuation marks, theatre genres, structures of theatre and theatre conventions among others.

ІІ. Objectives Module

  • To enhance students capacity of creating new stories for different medium.
  • To offer students a comprehensive understanding on playwriting for different media.
  • To deliver clear information about the features of stage, screen and radio medium and their elements.
  • To familiarize students with the elements, genres, structures, and styles of play.

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Dramatic Techniques (ThAr 1032)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description

The course call attention to various strategies in the writing of stage plays, radio drama &screenplay of both adult and children such as style, convention, structures, genres, and other dramatic elements.

  • Objective of the course
  • To offer a broad concept on the elements of theatre.
  • To bring a clear distinction, features and characteristics of various play genres. 
  • To introduce students with theatrical structures and major theatre styles.
    •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  • Learning Outcomes

After successfully concluding this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the elements of Drama
  • Gain basic concepts about playwriting
  • Write various types of plays
  • Understand the use of punctuation mark
  • Know major theatre styles of different times
  • Identify theatre conventions
  • Analyze various types of plays
  • Course Contents

Part One                                                                                                                                                               

  • Definition of play and playwriting
  • Elements of a play
  • Structure of a play
  • Conventional theatre
  • Unconventional theatre
  • Theatre conventions

Part Two

  • Theatre Genres
  • Thematic genre
  • Structural genre
  • Technical genre
  • Major playwriting styles of different times
  • Punctuation

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Attendance ————————————– 10%
  • Term paper ————————————– 30
  • Quiz ———————————————— 20%
  • Final exam —————————————- 40%
    • Reading Materials

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ፣ የተውኔትአፃፃፍዘዴ፣ አ.አ

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ፣ ዝክረተውኔት፣አ.አ፣ ብርሃንናሰላምማተሚያቤት፣ 1990

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ፣ ተውኔታዊመዝገበቃላትናፍቺዎቻቸው፣አ.አ

ዘሪሁንአስፋው፣ የስነፅሁፍመሰረታዊያን፣ አ.አ.ዩየኢትዮጵያቋንቋዎችናስፅሁፍክፍል፣ 1985

Maley Alan, Drama technique in language, London, Cambridge University press, 1978

                                                          Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Writing for Stage (ThAr 1033)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

By considering dramatic elements & keeping the three unity structures, it is expected to practice playwriting. Finding germinal idea of the play, creating a story, planning rough scenario and writing a one-act stage play.

  • Objective of the course
  • to enable students change their theoretical knowledge of Dramatic Techniques to practical writing of stage play
  • to broaden students’ knowledge of criticizing and analyzing plays
  • to prompt various ways of generating ideas for a certain play
  •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  • Learning Outcomes

Up on completion of this course students will be able to write full length plays of any genre. In addition students will have the ability to harmonize the elements of theatre and a stage play.

  • Course Contents
  • ways of generating ideas for one act play
  •  develop story for one act play
  • constructing scenario for one act play
  • preparing first draft of one act play
  • writing  final draft of one act play
  • Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Attendance ———————- 5%
  • Participation————————-5%
  • Continuous Assessment (story development, scenario development, first draft construction)—————40%
  • Final Exam (final draft of a full length play)———————————— 50%
  • Reading Materials

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ፣ የተውኔትአፃፃፍዘዴ፣ አ.አ

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ፣ ዝክረተውኔት፣አ.አ፣ ብርሃንናሰላምማተሚያቤት፣ 1990

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ፣ ተውኔታዊመዝገበቃላትናፍቺዎቻቸው፣አ.አ

ዘሪሁንአስፋው፣ የስነፅሁፍመሰረታዊያን፣ አ.አ.ዩየኢትዮጵያቋንቋዎችናስፅሁፍክፍል፣ 1985

ደበበሰይፉ፣ ቴአትርጥበብከፀሃፊተውኔቱአንፃር፣ አ.አ፣ ንግድማተሚያቤት፣ 1973

Smiley, Sam, Playwriting; the Structure of Action. New York

Pike, Frank, The Playwright’s Handbook. New York, 1985

Maley Alan, Drama technique in language, London, Cambridge University press, 1978

Katlen, E. George Play Writing the first workshop, focal press, Boston, 1994

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Writing for Screen (ThAr 1034)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

After getting overall understanding on film through the perspective of screenwriting, it is expected to Come up with new idea, develop story, writing treatment/scenario and short screenplay.

  • Objective of the course
  • Giving general introduction of film in relation to screenwriting
  • Clarify characteristics and elements of screenwriting 
  • To let students experience writing screen plays/films of different genres.
  •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  • Learning Outcomes

After finalizing this course students will be able to:

  • Analyze screen plays/films
  • Understand the basic features of screen plays/films
  • Develop their capacity of writing screen Plays/films
  • Criticize screen plays/films of different genres
  • Plan new screen drama/film
  • Analyze the use of visual elements and various techniques of the medium
  • Identify the unique features of screen play/film
    • Course Contents
  • General introduction about film & screenwriting
  • Elements of screenwriting
  • Story development
  • Treatment/scenario planning
  • Writing first draft for short screenplay
  • Revising & preparing final draft

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Attendance —————————————–5%
  • Quiz ————————————————– 15%
  • Story ————————————————- 15%
  • First Draft of a thirty minutes screen Play ———- 25%
  • Final draft of a thirty minutes screen play ——— 40%
  • Reading Materials

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Writing for Radio (ThAr 1035)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

Appreciate that everything in radio drama must be conveyed through the listener’s ear. This makes brief understanding of how to use dialogue effectively to convey action, dramatic conflict, character, setting, message and emotion. As a result, it is possible to make appropriate use of word pictures, sound effects and music within a radio drama. Finally, it is expected to write story, scenario/treatment, first & final draft for radio drama which is appropriate for 25-30 minute airtime coverage. 

  • Objective of the course
  • Giving common understanding of radio drama; specially, in relation to script
  • To bring the history of radio dramas, their characteristics and their elements. 
  • To let students experience writing radio drama of different genres.
  • To familiarize students with the basic concept of radio drama features.
  •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  • Learning Outcomes

After finalizing this course students will be able to:

  • Analyze radio plays
  • Understand the basic features of radio plays
  • Develop their capacity of writing Radio Plays
  • Criticize radio plays of different genres
  • Plan new Radio drama
  • Analyze the use of sound elements
  • Identify the unique features of Radio drama
    • Course Contents

Part One

  • Radio Drama
  • The History of Radio Drama
  • The Nature of the Medium

              Part Two

  • Basic Features of Radio Drama
  • Elements of Radio Drama
  •  Process of Radio Drama writing
  • Story
  • Scenario/treatment
  • First draft
  • Final draft
    • Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Attendance —————————————–5%
  • Quiz ————————————————– 15%
  • Story ————————————————- 15%
  • First Draft of a one hour Radio Play ———- 25%
  • Final Work of a one hour Radio play ——— 40%
  • Reading Materials
Wyatt, H & Amyes, T (2004) Audio Post Production for Television and Film: An introduction to technology and techniques Focal Press (3rd edition)
Viers, R (2008) The Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects Michael Wiese Productions (3rd edition)
Theme Ament, V (2009) The Foley Grail: The Art of Performing Sound for Film, Games and Animation Focal Press
Mott, RL (1990) Sound Effects: Radio, T.V. and Film Focal Press
Hoffert, P (2007) Composing Music for Videogames, Web Sites, Presentations and Other New Media Berklee Press Publications
Marks, A (2008) The Complete Guide to Game Audio: For Composers, Musicians, Sound Designers, Game Developers (Gama Network Series) Focal Press (2nd edition)

Sample of Radio Dramas

Biographical- ‘women’s hour’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00vspgz

Classic and period- ‘Classic serial’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00vrbq7

Crime- ‘A Charles Paris Mystery’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/programmes/genres/drama/crime

Political- ‘Afternoon Play’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/programmes/genres/drama/political

Relationships and romance- ‘Classic serial’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/programmes/genres/drama/relationshipsandromance

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

Production Design and Technology M-ThAr2011

Module Name Production Design and Technology
Module Code M-ThAr2011
Clustered Courses   1. Scene and Light Design   (ThAr2012) – 5 ECTS 2. Sound, Costume, Prop, and makeup design  (ThAr2013) – 5ECTS
ECTS 10
Total Module Study Hour hours (135 hours for each course)
  1. Module Description

 This module encompasses two courses: “Scene and light design”, And “sound , costume, prop and makeup design”. The module provide a fairly complete introduction to most aspect of technical theatre; given mainly in general sense but supplemented with specific topics related to stage theatre. The first course start by introducing the stage: types of stage and their feature, then emphasize in  elements and principles of scene and  light design. The second course offers the opportunity to learn, develop, and practice the art of sound , costume, prop and make up design by concentrates specifically on the processes, skills, and disciplines of design for theatre performance. Furthermore, students will read several plays and examine ways in which theater design can suggest meaning and interpretation of the script. Students will learn basic design elements and principles of composition through interactive, collaborative projects and exercises in addition to critically analyzing other designers’ works from a broad spectrum of design styles. Emphasis will be placed on creativity, discovery, analysis, and collaboration.

  1. Module Objective

At the end of the module students will be able to explain the purpose of technical design for theatre; identify the various technical aspects of theatre in production. Students will create abstract drawings utilizing elements and principles of Scene design and Stage lighting.

Competency

  • Students turn in a complete and entirely justified rationale for design concept.
  • Explore scenic design for the theater.
  • Apply stage craft skills on theatre productions.
  • Design and operate Light and sound systems.
  •  Design and make theatrical properties and maintain play integrity.

Criticize theatre productions with the basis of design and technology concepts

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Scene and Light Design (ThAr2012)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________                                                                                          

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

This course is composed of two technical inputs of production. These are light and scene. Part one focus on the methods and types of scene construction (mainly; procium arc, thrust stage, round stage). The second part deals with lighting techniques andkinds (spot light, flood light & foot light).

Objectives of the course

The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of scene and light design. It attempts to acquaint students with the purpose of scenery and light effect, the course is an exploration of the duties of stage technicians and their contribution the total aesthetic effect of a dramatic production. Topics covered will include design research and principle, scene shop organization, painting and construction techniques, equipment uses and maintenance principle and application of lighting.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

 Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course a student will:

  • Understand the design concept( including use of Lines, symbols, colours, texture and materials)
  • Understand the nature of light and lighting equipments .
  • Explain the basic physical and chemical properties of the technical aspects of scene and light design (i.e. light, color, electricity)
  • Able to analyze a Varity of texts from cultural and historical perspective to determine production requirement.
  • Develop designs that use visual and aural elements to convey environments that clearly support the text.

Course Contents  

  • Section One: Introduction: The identity, definition and use of basic technical theatre terminology, The responsibility of technical personnel including designers and operators, The technical components of theatre.

.

  • Section Two: Scene Design: Types of stage, elements and principle of scene design.Analyzing the text, Flore plan, elevations, and 3-D Model accuracy.
  • Section Three: Stage Lighting: History of light, Nature of light, symbol of light.
  • Section Four: Light Design : Types of stage light,  color, Patterns ,Dimmers, cable and connectors , Lighting boards, Control, Design..

Mode of Assessment

  • Assignment I:.Presentation of detailed analysis of play on designer concept. 20%
  • Assignment II: Presentation of: floor plan, Elevation ,3-D model , And Lighting design  for a play.50%

       –Final Written Examination: 30%

Reading Materials

References

Francis Hodge. (1994). Play Directing 4thed .prentice Hall, Inc.

Stephanie Arnold.(2001). The Creative Spirit.2nd  ed, Marshal Cavendish Limited

Wilson, Edwin. (1976). The Theater Experience. 7ht ed. Printed in United States of America.

R.A.Bank. (1991).Drama and Theatre Arts.1st ed. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data.

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Sound, Costume, Prop, and makeup Design ( ThAr2013)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description:

It deals on the theoretical and practical aspect of sound, costume, property and make up for theatre, radio drama and TV/film. Sound reproduction and sound reinforcement/sound technology; identifying costumes in everyday life and costumes for performance, shows the way of relevant usage; setting indicator use of property; in the chapter of makeup, it deals with the effective use of hairstyle and wigs/masks.

              Objectives of the course

This course is the continuation of ThAr2011-1.The course is designed to meet the diverse aesthetic and technological demands of contemporary theatre society. To enrolled students in theatre production several topics from: sound effect, costume design,    prop design, and make up design chosen to be discussed in this course .They will have the opportunity to track the development of theatre design through to modern day and evaluate the work of contemporary designers to inform their understanding.

           Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

          Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the course learners shall be able to;

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical and practical principle of designing and constructing the variables of technical theatre.
  • Practically apply the principle for productions.
  • Demonstrate the knowledge of the role, responsibility, and duty of a designer in  the area of technical theatre .
  • Work on collaboration with ply director, technical director other designers and production crew.
  • Evaluate technical aspects of productions.
  • Conduct research in the area of design and technology.

Course contents  

  • Section One: Sound design: Introduction, play analysis, Input (Microphone, analog tape, digital audio tape,/DAT/,compact disc, ) Recording ,Mixing board , signal processing, Equipments, output cabling and  connectors,
  • Section Two: Costume Design: Introduction, Procurement, Fabrics, Color, Patterns, Fitting, Rehearsal closing, Design.
  • Section Three: Prop Design:
  • Section Four: Makeup design:
  • Section Five: Experimentation.

Mode of Assessment

  • Assignment I: Studio/workshop practice .30%
  • Presentation of designs:/sound/costume/prop or makeup. 40%
  • Final Written Examination: 30%

Reading Materials

Francis Hodge. (1994). Play Directing 4thed .prentice Hall, Inc.

Stephanie Arnold.(2001). The Creative Spirit.2nd  ed, Marshal Cavendish Limited

Wilson, Edwin. (1976). The Theater Experience. 7ht ed. Printed in United States of America.

R.A.Bank. (1991).Drama and Theatre Arts.1st ed. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data.

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

Directing

Module Name Directing
Module Code M-ThAr2021
Clustered Courses   ThAr2022: Directing for stage ThAr2023: Directing for electronic media ThAr2024: Directing practicum
ECTS 15
Total Module Study Hour 405 hours (135 hours for each course)

 Module Description

This module encompasses three courses. Namely: Directing for stage, Directing for electronic media and directing practicum. With an emphasis on the collaborative process, the Directing Module’s purpose is to develop students with a solid foundation in the components of production and the interpretation of text, learn the specific language of theatre and electronic media and express their own vision through strong theatricality, clear scenic situations, visual metaphors and innovative concepts. Individuals are encouraged to make challenging choices, to break down barriers, and to create exciting, meaningful theatre and film.

 Module Objectives

An examination of the fundamentals of directing stage play and electronic media drama/films/ including a history of the arts, directorial text analysis, conceptual styles and approaches, and general problem-solving. Course format is a combination of theoretical lecture and practical lab experiences.

.

  1. Module Competency
  • Understand the theoretical and practical principles of directing
  • Demonstrate the knowledge of the role and responsibility of a director.
  • Identify the basic skill needed in different Drama medium.
  • Understand Major Variation of directing styles.

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  1. Directing for stage( ThAr2022)
  • Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

The course answers for the question of what is directing and deals with the role and duties of the play director, directors play analysis. The Director-Actor relationships, techniques of achieving composition, pasteurization, production schedule, prompt book, and practical of the theory.

  • Objectives of the course

This course is designed to introduce students to the history of stage directing as an independent art form and to the key directorial thinkers of Western theatre. Through both lecture and practice, students learn the theories and techniques of such innovators. The course deals with the role and duties of the play director, directors’ play analysis. The Director-Actor relationships, techniques of achieving composition, pasteurization, production schedule, prompt book, and practical of the theory

  •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  •  Learning Outcomes
  • Identify duties and responsibilities of Stage Director.
  • Adequately grasp methods of translating and  interpreting play on stage.
  • The ability to prepare promptbook.
  • The capacity to direct stage plays..
  • Criticize theatre productions in directional perspective.
    • Course Contents
  • Section I: Introduction: what is directing?

                               Background of directing

                                Duties and responsibilities of stage director

  • Section II: directing techniques
  • Process of directing:
  • Script selection
  • Script analysis
  • Character analysis
  • Casting
  • Prompt book preparation
  • Blocking/reharsal
  • Section V: Mounting production.

Mode of Assessment

Presentation: Script analysis.30 %

Prompt book preparation: 30%

Test: 10%

Final Written Exam: 30%

Reading Materials

Chekhov, Michael (1963). Director and playwright . New your: Harper and Row Publisher.

O’Nell and Beet (1987).The Director As Artist. New york: Holt Winston

 Benedetti,Robert(1976)           Actor at work ,prenticehall,Englewoodcliffis,Newjersy.

Thomas, James – Script Analysis for Actors, Directors and Designers

Frost,Anthony and Ralph yarrrow (1990).Improvisation in Drama. macmillan press ltd. Lodon

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Directing for Electronic Media (ThAr2023)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

          Course Description:

It is composed of directing techniques that serves for different media; i.e.TV/film and radio. Mainly, it identifies differences in audio and visual narration of story. In the behalf of radio drama director, cue sheet preparation (sound/music,)natural or studio recordings are expected to realize the production. On the other hand, screen directors have tasks which are script selection, breakdown, storyboard preparation, casting and shooting scenes.    

   Objectives of the course

This course designed to introduce students the fundamentals of directing for electronic media and explore the possibilities of storytelling, giving the student both the narrative craft and visual techniques necessary to bring a story to life on the screen, Television, and radio. The course augmenting the basics of the key filmmaking disciplines – Directing, Producing, Production Design, Cinematography, and Post-Production – as well as film theory essentials. The students introduced to the demands of assistant directing and get firsthand experience in the script development process. Finally, develop teamwork and collaboration skills that prepare to work effectively with fellow filmmakers and electronic media crews.

      Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical and practical principle of directing film, TV, and Radio dramas.
  • Demonstrate the knowledge of the role , responsibility, duty of a director of film, TV and Radio Drama.
  • Evaluate film, TV And Radio drama productions from directing perspectives.
  • Conduct research in the area of film TV and Radio Drama.
  • Ability to prepare shooting scripts.
  • The understanding and delivery of the different technical and directing requirement of film radio and television drama production.

                        Contents

  • Section one: Introduction to film language:  the film world, film language, shots, film grammar, screen direction, film times, elaboration, and familiar images.
  • Section two: Dramatic elements embedded in the screen play: spines, whose film is it? Character circumstance dynamic relationships, wants, expectations, actions, activities, acting beats.
  • Section three: Organizing action in a dramatic scene:Dramatic blocks, narrative beats, the fulcrum,
  • Section four: staging: Main functions, pattern of dramatic, movement changing, the stage with a scene, staging with a location, floor plan.
  • Section Five: TV drama: The TV medium, writing for TV drama, tradition of TV drama and types of TV drama, TV drama production.
  • Section Six: Radio Drama: The Radio medium, the role and responsibilities of radio director, developing script for radio directing, the interrelationship between the radio drama director and actors, The studio and microphone , the production, Radio serial dramas.

            Mode of Assessment

  • Presentation: Script analysis.30 %
  • Test:20%
  • Final Written Exam:50%.

      Reading Materials

Roger D.Wimmer/ Joseph R. Mass Media Research: Dominick (1997: wadsworkPublishing company

Fairweather, R.(1998) Basic studio Directing , focal press.

Hindman, J L Kirkman&E.Monk , TV acting: A manual for camera performance, newyork: hasting.

Millerson, G. (1999) TVproduction, focal press.

Thompson, R. (1998) the grammar of the shot, focal press.

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Directing Practicum (ThAr2024)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description:

It is an interpretation of theoretical concepts of directing in practical. Preparing short production by considering all directing methods & process. It starts with the selection of script and ends by realization of production.

Objective of the course

In this course the students put in to practice the theoretical knowledge of directing plays for stage, screen, TV and Radio. Students are required to direct one short play for stage or one of the electronic media they prefer by selecting from experimental, avant-garde, and musical category, targeting different age group and media.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Learning Outcomes

After the completion of this module, the students will be able to:

  • Apply methods and techniques of directing short plays at least for one of the media.
  • Critically appreciate practice of directing in the selected area of the media ,
  • Articulate the correlation between media arts and production personnel.
  • Create devised work in the context of multi arts directing.
  • Practical skill relevant to direct play for stage, and electronic media.
  • Demonstration and assembling skill.
  1. Course Contents

Section one: choosing script

Section two: Casting.

Section three: Promptbook/ shooting script preparation/cue sheet

Section Four; Rehearsals

Section Five: Production.

  1. .Mode of Assessment
  2. Promptbook /shooting script/: 20%
  3. Rehearsals:30%
  4. Presentation of Production : 50%

.

  • Reading Materials

Roger D.Wimmer/ Joseph R. Mass Media Research: Dominick (1997: wadsworkPublishing company

Fairweather, R.(1998) Basic studio Directing , focal press.

Hindman, J L Kirkman&E.Monk , TV acting: A manual for camera performance, newyork: hasting.

Millerson, G. (1999) TVproduction, focal press.

Thompson, R. (1998) the grammar of the shot, focal press.

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

Art Appreciation

Module Name Art Appreciation
Module Code M-ThAr2031
Clustered Courses   ThAr2032: Aesthetics-5EtCTS ThAr2033: Basics of Painting –5EtCTS ThAr2034 :Basics of music-5EtCTS ThAr2035:Basics of dance-5EtCTS
Module EtCTS 20
Total Module Study Hour 512 hours
  1.  Module Description

This module comprises of four courses, namely Aesthetics, Basics of painting, and Basics of Music & Basics of Dance. The first course in the module deals about aesthetic concepts, values and beauty which found in artistic works. The second course is basics of painting. It gives theoretical and practical hints of painting. Thirdly, there is a course called basics of music that states on fundamentals of music, voice & articulation. At last, a course entitled basics of dance comes and gives the knowledge of basic step of traditional Ethiopian dance and common modern dance. 

  1.  Module Objectives

After completing this module students will be able to identify aesthetic qualities of any artistic work & create beauty in their imaginative work. In addition, students will be mentally relaxed, physically flexible. At the same time, they can articulate their voice for performance/speech and paint scene or background for theatre/film production.

  1. Competency
  2. Understand and familiar with the concept of aesthetics & beauty
  3. Practice scene painting & decoration
  4. Articulating smart voice & speaks clear/audible speech
  5. Mental & physical fitness for stage/screen performance

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Aesthetics (ThAr2032)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

This course intends to develop the students understanding of the nature, process, and practices of appreciation and beauty that is found in the arts.  This will enable the student to acquire and develop the basic skills in art analyses, appreciation, and emotional responses. The course explores the beauty of art in nature, aesthetics, and various works from theatrical schools.  The course will require the student to criticize and respond to these aesthetic qualities of the materials given.

Objective of the course

By the end of the semester the student will be able to:

          Explain the concept of Aesthetics and background,

          Identify the philosophical concepts of the arts,

          Select principles, share appreciation, and experiences from the beauty of art,

          Organize the aesthetic responses in materials,

          Analyze the basic components of aesthetics, and

          Criticize analyses of materials

.

 Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery        Lectures          Project Work   Field/lab work Presentation    Tutorials          Assessment            Independent study      Total

Study Hours

Block   30        18                    16                    24        30        118

1.3       Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

          Know what aesthetics mean and its historical background

          Undermine aesthetics experience and properties

 Identify roles of aesthetics on theatre and film works.

Course Contents

Unit One:

The concept of the meaning of Aesthetics, Form, and Purpose

Definitions of Aesthetics, Broad, and Specific

The Basis of Aesthetics Development

Beauty in Nature

Unit Two:

1.1       Basic Elements in Aesthetic Development

1.2       The Importance and Value of Philosophy of Art

1.3       The Sources of Beauty

1.4       Criteria’s for Appreciating the Beauty of Nature

Unit Three:

3.1 Criteria for Organization of the Arts

3.2 Function of Beauty

3.3 General Principle of Organizing Aesthetics

3.4 Artistic Elements and Categories

Unit Four: Aesthetics and Various Works of Arts

4.1 The Philosophy of Art and Painting and the Philosophy of performing art and Literature

4.2 Beauty in Nature, Society and its Life     

4.3 appreciating the process

4.4 Aesthetic Analyses: Meaning of Artistic Criticism and Purpose of Art Criticism

                                             Types of Aesthetic Criticism and Instruments for Criticizing Works of art                  

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

–           Presentation: students will select one topic form the course content prepare an oral presentation based on a review of scientific journal articles and make an oral presentation. This will account for 10 % of your total mark.

–           Assignment: students will select one Script or performance of screen, radio or stage drama and do analysis on aesthetics value of this medium. This will account for 20 % of your total mark.

–           Tests:—-10%

–           Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark

–           Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.

1.6       Reading Materials

  George, Dickie : Art and the Aesthetic (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1974). 

Noël, Carroll “Beauty and the Genealogy of Art Theory,” Philosophical Forum, vol. xxii, no. 4

Monroe, Beardsley: “An Aesthetic Definition of Art,” in What is Art?, edited by Hugh Curtler

             (New York: Havens Publishers, Inc., 1983), pp. 15–29; 

Harold Osborne, “What is a Work of Art?,” British Journal of Aesthetics, vol. 23 (1981),

                           pp. 1-11; 

William,Tolhurst “Toward an Aesthetic Account of the Nature of Art,” The Journal of

               Aesthetics and Art Criticism, vol. 42 (1979), pp. 1–14. See also:

Bohdan, Dziemidok, “Controversy about the Aesthetic Nature of Art,” British Journal of

                                      Aesthetics, vol. 28 (1988), pp. 1–17.

 Jerome Stolnitz, Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art Criticism (New York: Houghton Mifflin

                               Co., 1960), pp. 32–42

George Dickie, “The Myth of the Aesthetic Attitude,” American Philosophical Quarterly, vol. 1

(1964), pp. 56– 65. Objections can also be found in

Noël Carroll, “Art and Interaction,” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, vol. XLV,

no. 1 (Fall 1986), pp. 57–68.

Göran ,Hermerén: The Nature of Aesthetic Qualities (Lund: Lund University Press, 1988). 

  Alan, H.Goldman: “Realism about Aesthetic Properties,” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art

                  Criticism, vol. 51, no. 1 (Winter, 1993), pp. 31–38.

 Frank Sibley, “Aesthetic Concepts,” Philosophical Review, vol. 68 (1959), pp. 421–450;

  Frank Sibley, “Aesthetic and Non-Aesthetic,” Philosophical Review, vol. 74 (1965), pp. 135–

159. 

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Basics of Painting(ThAr2033)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

This course gives both theoretical and practical usage of color in the scene painting.Background decoration for stage performances and camera shootings by using different symbolic colors.

  • Objective of the course

This course aims to equip students with knowledge of color usage in scene painting and stage decoration for major genres of drama and film.

  •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour
Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
block 28 24   16 6 24 34 132
  • Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand symbolic meaningof color as performance background
  • Know color usage for dramas & film
  • Use relevant colors for scene painting
  • Course Contents
  • Part 1:  color types
  •  Part 2: symbolic representation of color
  • Part 3:  How to use colors for each genre i.e.in stage theatre & TV/film
  • Part 4: practical use of colors(color mix) for each medium
    • Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of color design, practical scene painting and a final examination.

  • Theoretical assignment: students will design colors for stage performance or film production. This will account for 20 % of your total mark.
  • Project work: students will select one Script or performance of stage theatre/film production and do background painting for one of each. This will account for 20 % of your total mark.
  • Tests:—-10%
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.
  • Reading Materials

Arnold, Richard L., Scene Technology. New Jersey: Simon & Schuster Company, 1985.

Stephen Richardson: Technical theatre handbook.Worcester Polytechnic Institute,1996.

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

1. Basics of music (ThAr2034)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

  • Objective of the course

By the end of the block course, students will have a clear understanding of:

  • Music, Acoustic, musical sound and nonmusical sound,
  • Identify the music staff and the different clefs,
  • Proper music notation: clef signs, meter, rhythm, notation, bar lines, and articulations,
  • Explain the importance of time value in the notation system,
  • Identify the subdivision of note values and their rests: whole notes, half notes, quarter notes, eighth notes, and dotted notes,
    • Mode of Delivery and Study Hour
Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
parallel 24 10   16 20 28 30 128
  1. Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Know What is music, musical and nonmusical sounds
  • Undermine Proper notation of music and rhythm
  1. Course Contents

Module Unit 1: Introduction to Music

  1. What is music, musical and nonmusical sounds.
    1. The Music Staff: Lined and Spaced Notes.
    1. The Music Clef, the Treble (G) and Bass (F) Clefs.
    1. The Musical Alphabet and its relationship to pitch/notation.
  2. Pitches in the Treble and Bass Clefs

Unit 2: Significance in Time

  • Music Note Values and their Rests: Whole Note, Half Note, Quarter Note, Eighth Note, and Dotted Half Notes.
  • Understanding the subdivision of the note values and their rests

2.2 Notation of Rhythm and the Time Signature.

  • Proper notation of music and rhythm
    • The Time Signature: Simple Time Signature: 2/4, ¾, and 4/4
  • Learn to count rhythm by the time signature
  1. Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of vocal & rhythm exercises, assignment (which they will write following all standards of academic writing), test and a final examination.

  • Vocal exercise & rhythm: students should examined by voice exercise and rhythm keeping. This will account 20 % of your total mark.
  • Assignment: students should do theoretical assignment based on what you learn. This will account for 20 % of your total mark.
  • Tests:—-10%
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.
  1. Reading Materials

Ayola, Edward L., Winning Rhythms. 1985 Kjos Music Company, San Diego, California, USA.

Haroutounian, Joanne, Explorations in Music Book 2, Theory, Ear Training, Analysis, and Composition. 1993 Kjos Music Company, San Diego, California, USA.

Heussenstamm, George. The Norton Manual of Music Notation.1987 W.W. Norton & Company, New York, New York, USA.

Kostk,a S. and Payne, D. Tonal Harmony. 2004 5th Ed. McGraw Hill, San Francisco, California, USA.

Kostka, S. and Payne, D. Tonal Harmony Workbook. 2004 5th Ed. McGraw Hill, San Francisco, California, USA.

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

1. Basics of Dance (ThAr2035)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

Basics of dance gives clear understanding on individual and group dances. In addition to this, it gives knowledge and skill of traditional Ethiopian dance and modern dance. At the same time, learners obtain team sprit & body flexibility.

Objective of the course

This course aims to equip students with common understanding of basic steps of some traditional Ethiopian dance & modern dances.

 Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
block 20 22   20 6 32 30 130

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Adapt body flexibility
  • Practice some common dances
  • Practice Ethiopian traditional dance

Course Contents

  • What is dance?
  • Individual dance
  • Team dances
  • Team sprit
  • Harmony
  • Commitment
  • unity
  • How to dance Ethiopian traditional dance?
  • Tigregna
  • Amharic
  • Oromgna
  • Afargna
  • Somaligna
  • Walayta
  • Gumuz
  • Gambella
  • Modern Dance:
  • Buggy
  • Waltzes
  • Twist
  • Salsa
  • Importance of dance
  • Emotional relief
  • Body flexibility

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on practical exercise of different types of dance.

  • Body flexibility: testing physical readiness and relaxation will account 10% mark
  • Basic steps of three Ethiopian traditional dances: students will select three Ethiopian traditional dances and perform. This accounts 20% marks.
  • Modern dance: students are expected to show two modern dances which you prefer. It will contain 20% marks.
  • Final examination:traditional and modern group dances. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.

Reading Materials

Ayola, Edward L., Winning Rhythms.1985 Kjos Music Company, San Diego, California, USA.

Haroutounian, Joanne, Explorations in Music Book 2, Theory, Ear Training, Analysis, and Composition.1993 Kjos Music Company, San Diego, California, USA.

                VIDEOS

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

Art Management & Entrepreneurship

Module Name Art Management & Entrepreneurs hip
Module Code M-Thar 2041
Clustered Course Name Art Management(ThAr2042) Entrepreneurs hip (ThAr2043)
ECTS 10 ECTS
Total Module Study Hour hours

Module description:

This module contains two parts. These are art management and entrepreneurship. In the first part, students will gain management skills for the actualization of artistic products. Secondly, they can understand market environment for their artistic output.

Module Objectives

After successful completion of this module, students will be able to manage creative products and involve in market.

 Competency

After studying this course students will be able to:

  • prepare business plan
  • have managing skills of any artistic production
  • aware on challenges that face on their way
  • ready to pass obstacles 

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Art Management (ThAr2042)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description:

This course helps learner to pass challenges/obstacles that face practitioners in the process of production. It gives technical knowledge and skill to hand over each phases; i.e. preproduction, due production and post production.

Objective of the course

This course aims to build up students with skills of production management of drama & film.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
parallel                

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Know what art management is
  • Know challenges that face in the process of production
  • Manage theatre, radio & film/TV productions

Course Contents

  • Definitions: what is art management?
  • How to overtake management tasks of a productions:
  • Stage management
  • Radio drama production management
  • TV/film production management
  • obstacles that face art manager at:
  • Preproduction phase
  • Due production phase
  • Post production phase

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of project work, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Project work: students will prepare project work that shows your management skill. This will account for 20 % of your total mark.
  • Assignment: students will do written assignment. This will account for 20 % of your total mark.
  • Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.

Reading Materials

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Entrepreneurs hip (ThAr2043)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description

This course is designed to introduce practitioners with the nature and importance of entrepreneurship, routes to business, financing the business, managing the business and finally winding up of the business.

Objective of the course

After the successful completion of the course practitioners will be able to:

  • Define what entrepreneurship is,
  • Explain the importance of entrepreneurship for economic development,
  • List the routes to start-up a new business,
  •  Explain the product life cycle,
  • Discuss the product portfolio matrix,                and
  • Explain closure of the business

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
parallel 24 30   15 8 18 30 125

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Know what entrepreneurship is ,
  • Design business plans
  • See new business areas
  • Run small & large scale businesses 

Course Contents

I: Introduction

  1. Nature and development of entrepreneurship
  2. Definition
  3. Entrepreneurial decision process
  4. Roles of Entrepreneurship in economic development
  5. Characteristics of entrepreneurship

II. Routes to small business

  1. Buying, Inheriting, Franchising
  2. Starting new business

2.1. Sources of business idea

2.2 Methods of generating new business idea

2.3 Developing business plan

2.4 Financing the business

III. Managing the business

1.      Decision Making

2.      Growth and Success

2.1        Product life cycle

2.2        Product portfolio

3.      Winding up of the business

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of  a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Business plan: students should prepare small scale business plan. This will account for 20 % of your total mark.
  • Business plan presentation:10%
  • Theoretical Assignment: students should do theoretical assignments that assure conceptual understanding. It will account 10% marks.
  • Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.

Reading Materials

  Paul Burns (2001), Entrepreneurship and small business. Antony Rowe Ltd, Great Britain. 

Histrichpeters (1998) Entrepreneurship, Irwin/MCGraw –Hill Company, New York

Vasant Desai (2001) Dynamics of Entrepreneurial development and   Management. Himalaya Publishing house, Mumbai¹

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

Theatre Specials

Module Name Theatre Specials
Module Code ThAr3011
Clustered Courses   1.Musical Theatre   (ThAr3012) – 5 ECTS 2. Youth and children Theatre (ThAr3013) – 5ECTS 3. Traditional drama(ThAr3014) 5ECTS 4. Theatre For Development.(ThAr3015) 5ECTS
ECTS 20
Total Module Study Hour 540 hours (135 hours for each course)
  • Module Description

 This module augmenting four courses. Musical Theatre   (ThAr3011-1) , Youth and children Theatre (ThAr3011-2) , Traditional Theatre,.(ThAr3011-3),Theatre For Development. (ThAr3011-4), a dynamic theatre program dedicated to developing students who are able to bridge creative artistic practice with contemporary theories on those theatre forms. In teaching and learning as well as entertaining functions in our ever-changing multicultural society. The module is designed through eclectic and holistic approach allows students to develop multiple skill sets that can be used to travel down a variety of different career paths; performance, creation, education and art administration in those theatre specials.

  • Module Objective

At the end of the module students will be able to explain the basic features of forms of theatre specials: Musical theatre, Traditional Theatre, Youth and Children theatre and theatre For Development. Furthermore, Students will able to practice writing, performing, directing, and managing in those theatre productions. Also students will able to conduct research on those theatre forms.

Competency

  • Identify the basic technical elements of each special forms of theatre.
  • Write a dramatic script, perform, direct, and manage special forms of theatres.
  • Conduct research in the area of musical theatre, traditional theatre, youth and children theatre, and theatre for development.
  • Criticize theatre productions of special forms in their own perspective.

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Musical Theatre (ThAr3012)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description:

This course is deals with the three clustered arts – theatre, music, and dance. In this course students will familiar with the combination of music, theatre and dance and basic elements of musical theatre.

Objectives of the course

     This course introduces students to musical theatre and makes them have knowledge on the relationship among the three sister arts: Music, Dance and Drama. The course repertoire concentrating on ensemble and solo singing, with an emphasis on vocal technique, diction, and musicality and writing libretto/musical script/. Movement and musical theater dance styles are also introduced. Finally, a combination of acting, voice, and movement exercises is used to help students explore and develop their total instrument. Students work on individual musical theater pieces, with instruction focusing on imaging, phrasing, articulation, and audition technique.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

     The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

 Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course a student will:

  • Identify the basic elements of musical theatre.
  • Write a libretto /musical script/ for musical drama.
  • Select music to underscore a performance.
  • Develop a scene based on a work of art.
  • Develop a scene that incorporate simple dance steps or unified movement.
  • Perform a scene from a musical.

           Course Contents  

  • Section One :Introduction: The identity, definition and use of basic elements of musical theatre, history of musical theatre.
  • Section Two: The appeal of music and dance:.
  • Section Three: Types of musical drama :
  • Section Four: Writing for musical: lyrist, librettist, choreographer, composer, musical director.
  • Section five: Rehearsals :

Mode of Assessment

  • Assignment I:.  Individual assignment / short libretto/chirography or other scenario .20%
  • Assignment II: Group Presentation of 30 minute musical theatre production:50%
  • Final Written Examination: 30%

Reading Materials

References

Banham, martin, The Cambridge Guide to Theatre,(1988) Cambridge university press

Carva, Laurence and Alexander dean,(1989) Fundamentals of Play Directing, Forthrodth Holt Rienhart and dietrich, John Ei Wwinston inc. (1953), Play Direction U.S.A, prentice Hall, inc.

Griffiths, Trevor R.ed.(1982) Stage Craft, London Pardons Press Ltd.

Weisstein, Ulrich (1964). The Essence of Opera U.S.A Norton Library

Wilson, Edwin. The Theatre Experience (1998) New York, MCGrawHillCD.

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Youth and Children Theatre.(ThAr3013)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description:

 This course deals with children and youth psychology. More of, it concentrates on dramatic elements, story development, improvisational production for target audience (children & youth age groups)

Objectives of the course

     The course “Youth and Children Theatre” designed to introduce students concepts, terminology and experience of theatre for young and early are groups. It will explore ways to use theatre arts as an enhancement of children and young development, education, expression and recreation. Students gain theoretical knowledge and practical experience through class demonstration and theatrical productions.

.Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

     The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

 Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will: 

  • Define the basic terms used in the study and practice of children’s theatre
  •  Identify the organizational and administrative responsibilities of a children’s theatre director. 
  • Analyze and evaluate stories, music, dance and history sources for playmaking for preschool, elementary and adolescent students. 
  •  Demonstrate through a production book/project the choice of material for a children’s theater play or activity.  This will include an analysis of the genre and style and appropriateness of the material, a breakdown on cost, technical theatre needs, rehearsal scheduling and text blocking and notations. 
  • Demonstrate through exercises an understanding of basic acting activities for children, including warm-up techniques, pantomime, improvisations, play structure and creating the scenes. 
  • Utilize effective strategies in conducting a rehearsal or class activity with children. 
  •         Evaluate and asses research in a community theatre, church, school, or   recreational district that would lead to creating a proposal to establish a children’s theatre program. 
  • Demonstrate through examination an understanding of the psychology of dramatic activities for the child.  
  • Identify and describe the extended use of Children’s theatre in playmaking for religious education, creative dramatic classes for recreation departments, creative drama in psychotherapy, and creative dramatics for speech improvement..

 Course Contents 

  • Section one: introduction: The identity, definition and use of basic elements of youth and

                                                   Children theatre

  • Section Two:, Basic concepts: dramatic play, creative drama, playmaking, informal drama,

                                                        Improvisation, pantomime, story dramatization, integrated

                                                       Projects, therapeutic drama, play structure.

  • Section Three :purposes and uses: child growth, cultural awareness, recreation, theatre

                                 Knowledge, religious education, psychotherapy, speech improvement.

  • Section Four :Children and youth psychology:
  • Section Five: Organizing/ running and children’s theatre:fee and rules, legal questions,

                              performance techniques, staffing, place to perform.

  •  

Mode of Assessment

  • Assignment I:.  Individual assignment. 5%
  • Assignment II: Group Presentation of mini research and written production project.20%
  •  III: Rehearsals. 15%
  •  IV: short length play production/with group/. 40%
  • Final Written Examination: 20%

Reading Materials

References

Spolin, Viola: Improvisation for the Theatre or Other Equivalent Collegiate Text

Bryan, Jone Campbell .  Spokane Children’s Theatre (Company in 1946, website in 2001) www.spokanechildrenstheatre.org (May 2003)

Bocaz-Larson, D.M. Children’s Plays. 2002
http://www.geocities.com/pocolocoplayers/child.html (June 3, 2003)

Buchanan, Matt. Children’s Theatre/Creative Drama. 2002.
http://www.childdrama.com/mainframe.html (13 April 2003)

Buchanan, Matt . Creative Drama Lesson Plans.
<
http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/Alley/3765/lessons.html >(April 24, 2003)

Buchanan, Matt. Puppets in the Classroom. 2002.
http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/Alley/3765/puppets.html  (13 April 2003)

Calkins, Betty . Kids Klub Theatre.
< http://www.mykidsklub.com >

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Traditional drama (ThAr3014)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description

In this course indigenous knowledge and traditional performances will covered. During this course students will introduce different folklore and traditions of Ethiopia and performed on stage. And it is very important to intensify and conservation of indigenous knowledge of nations nationalities and peoples of Ethiopia. 

  • Objective of the course

The general objective of the course is to identify and validate traditional drama and indigenous knowledge, and enhance utilization and conservation of tradition at national level. The course also strives to reveal the importance and meaning of tradition in order to equip students with their own indigenous practices and their original identity. In addition, this course aims to promote, recognize, identify, record, transfer and disseminate various traditional activities and indigenous knowledge of the country to its students and a wider community.

  •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  • Learning Outcomes

After finalizing this course students will be able to:

  • Analyze indigenous and traditional performances;
  • Understand the meaning of tradition and its importance for a society;
  • Dig out diverse findings of the past;
  • Promote traditional activities of a certain society;
  • Able to analyze the society he/she live in;
  • Know his/her past and develop its capacity to identify and promote the best practices of the society;
  • Course Contents
  • Tradition
  • Culture
  • Indigenous knowledge
  • Folklore
  • Research on tradition
  • Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Attendance ————————————– 10%
  • Term paper ————————————– 30
  • Final exam —————————————- 60%
  • Reading Materials

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  • Theatre for Development (ThAr 3015)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description

This course discloses the students the way of problem solving method in theatre. By implement different kinds of Theatre for development (forum theatre, invisible theatre, image theatre…. etc) students will train how they use theatre arts for the development of their community as well as the country and the eradication of barriers of development.

  • Objective of the course

This course mainly aims to provide students the basic knowledge and skill of solving problems of their surroundings. In addition it stands to:

  • Build the capacity of students to deal with a certain society
  • Solve problems with the full participation of the audience
  • Help students and the society not to repeat its old mistakes
  • Enable students to use traditional methods
  • Show students and the society that, theatre can be used as a major tool of development
  • Build students with democratic ways of teaching and changing its surroundings.
  • Provide the chance for students to respect social values of the society
  • Develop student’s skills of solving problems that hinders the society from its development in a two way communication
  • To show students that theatre for development Is a development tool which is developed by the society for the society
  •  Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

  • Learning Outcomes

After successfully finalizing this course students will be able to:

  • Understand the meaning and effects of Theatre for Development
  • Provide solutions for any society and problem
  • Assist any developmental endeavors at large
  • Change the society
  • Course Contents
  • Theatre for Development
  • Why do we do theatre for development?
  • Types of theatre for development
  • Simultaneous Dramaturgy 
  • Frame Theatre
  • Forum Theatre
  • Popular Theatre
  • Invisible Theatre
  • Community Based Theatre
  • Theatre of Liberation
  • Image Theatre
  • Legislative Theatre
  • Entertainment Education Drama
  • Theatre for Development for the World
  • Theatre for Development for Africa
  • Theatre for Development for Ethiopia
  • Ways of implementing Theatre for Development
  • Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Attendance ————————————– 5%
  • Term paper ————————————– 30
  • Quiz ————————————————20
  • Final exam —————————————- 45%
  • Reading Materials
  • Bea, Kershaw: The Politics of Performance: Radial Theatre as Cultural Intervention.
  • Boal, Augusto: 1) theatre of oppressed
  •                           2) Games for actors and non-actors
  • Bhrucha, Ruston: Theatre and the World: Performance and the Politics of Culture.
  • Grotowski, Jerzy: Towards Poor Theatre.

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

 Dramaturgy

Module Name Dramaturgy
Module Code M-ThAr3031
Clustered Courses   ThAr3032 :Practice of Dramaturge-5 EtCTS ThAr3033 :Research  methodology & report writing-5 EtCTS ThAr3034:Translation5 EtCTS
Module EtCTS 15
Total Module Study Hour 381 hours 

 Module Description

This module is composed by three courses. These are practice of dramaturge, research methodology & report writing and translation.

 Module Objectives

After completing this module students will be able to familiar with the concept & practice of dramaturge, research methods & report writing. At the same time,the module can produce translators.

Competency

  • Students can practice dramaturge
  • Students can do research
  • Students can translate from language to language

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Practice of Dramaturge (ThAr3032)

       Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

              Course Description:

It defines dramaturge, shows historical background and its function in theatre. The course discusses dramaturgical function, dramaturgy and professionalization, dramaturgy & politics of identity.

Objective of the course

              Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

·        know definition of dramaturge

·        learn the basic backgrounds, theories & approaches of dramaturge

·  know Professionalization of dramaturgical functions

           Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
Block 30 18   16 4 24 30 122

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will able to:

  • Define dramaturge
  •  Know dramaturgical periods
  • Understand dramaturgical functions

           Course Outline:

Unit One -Introduction

1.1. Definition of dramaturge

             1.2. Dramaturgical functions and functionaries 1576-1800

Unit Two – Dramaturge in 19 century England

2.1. Literary administration and the (actor) manager 1800-1900

2.2. play readers and literary advisers 1800- 1900

Unit Three – dramaturge & literary management in England today

3.1. The silent revolution

3.2. Professionalization of dramaturgical functions

         3.3. Dramaturgy & politics of identity

          3.4 Academic & Industry training

  1. Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of debate, assignment (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Assignment:20%
  • Presentation:10%
  • Tests:—-10%
  • Quiz:10
  • Final examination: 50%
    • Reading Materials

References:

Luckhurst,Marry: Dramaturgy: A Revolution In Theatre

videos

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE SYLLABUS/ COURSE GUIDE            

 Research Methodology & Report Writing (ThAr3033)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description

Language research: concept, scope, types, components, steps;  procedures in conducting research: selecting a topic, narrowing it down, stating problems, writing objectives, selection methods, organizing (outlining) and interpreting data, and concluding the study; techniques of referencing; methods of documentation: in-text citation, bibliography, etc.; format of research; data presentation.

Objectives of the course

The main aims of the course are to;

  • know meaning, types, characteristics, procedures, and organization of research
  • Identify the principles, importance, techniques, procedures and format of research and report writing.
  •  Identify the principles, systems and different types of citation of bibliography.
  • Expect to do research paper for the fulfillment of Bachelor of Arts.
  • To solve different kinds of problems in the sector of the discipline.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
Block 30 8 8 15 20 19 35 135

.Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to:

  • Comprehend the major methods of Artistic research together with their characteristics, advantages and limitations.
  • Skills of identifying research topics and appropriate research methods for the topics selected.
  • Skills of spotting, accessing and selecting appropriate source materials.
  • Skills of outlining, composing and recomposing as well as editing research paper.
  • The ability to document sources used in an adequate and consistent manner.

 Course Content

Definition, uses, and characteristics of research

1.1.    Definition

1.2.    Uses 

1.3   Concepts and terms in language research

      2. Procedures in Conducting Research

2.1. Selecting a topic

2.2. Narrowing it down

2.3. Stating problems

2.4. Writing objectives

                  2.5. Selecting methods

      2.6. Organizing and interpreting data

                 2.7. Writing conclusions and recommendation

       3. Reviewing related literature

           3.1.The ‘why’ and ‘what’ of literature review

           3.2. Attributing others work

                   3.2.1. In-text citation

                   3.2.2. Referencing

       4. Methods of data collection and analysis

            4.1. Methods of Data collection

                           4.1.1. Questionnaires

         4.1.2. Interviews

         4.1.3. Observations

  • Document analysis and Others

4.2. Method of data analysis

                      4.2.1. Quantitative method

                      4.2.2. Qualitative method

                      4.2.3. Integrated approach

         5. Format of a Research paper

 5.1.The front matters

5.2.The main body

The reference matters

Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 5%
  • Test (3) = 15%
  • Assignment =15%
  •    Project proposal =15%
  •  Final Senior Essay/project=50%

         Total =100%

  1. Reading Materials
  2. Best, w.Jhon and khan v.JamesResearch in education. (2007)
  3. Chara, s. Research methodology statistical method. (2007)
  4. Hot, k. paul and goode, J.W. Methods in social research. (2005)
  5. Parkash, Ravi Methods of educational research. (2005)

                                               Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

  Translation (ThAr3034)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

             Course Description

This course treats the art of translation from the dual perspectives of theory and practice. We shall look at various theoretical issues that impact on the choices translators make and spend much of class time practicing various translation strategies and honing particular techniques. The course also give emphasis to language and culture as they impinge on the process of translation and familiarizes students with a variety of strategies for dealing with mismatches between source and target languages and cultures. Topics covered include textual and contextual meaning; genres and text types; dialect and register in translation; translating culture-specific references; wordplay, metaphor and puns.

                 Objective of the course

              Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

·        learn the basic outline of the history of translation;

·        learn the basic theories, approaches, and specialized terminology of the discipline of translation;

·        improve translation skills related to specific language pairs;

·        apply these theories and approach, and utilize the specialized terminology in actual translation situations in a variety of minor subject (language) texts; and

·        show sufficient understanding of the linguistic and cultural factors which have a bearing on written communication across sensitive media and genres;

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
Block 30 18   16 6 24 30 124

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will able to:

  • Define meaning of translation and its historical background
  • Familiar at least with two languages
  • Translate texts
  • know techniques of translation

Course content

Unit One – Perspectives on Translation

1.1. What is translation?

1.1.1.       Historical background of translation

1.1.2.      Methods of translation

1.1.3.      Types of translation

Unit Two – The Translator and the Process of Communication

2.1. What is translator?

2.2. What is the translator supposed to do during translation?

2.3. Problems that face translator

2.4. The translation process

Unit Three – Literary translation

3.1. Drama translation

3.2. Poetry translation

         3.3. Prose translation

Unit Four – Characteristics of translation

Unit Five – Significance of translation

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of debate, assignment (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Text/media translation:This will account for 20 % of total mark.
  • Assignment:literary translation. This will account 30 % of total mark.
  • Tests:—-10%
  • Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 30 % of your total mark.

Reading Materials

References:

Arnold, D.J., Balkan, L., Meijer, S., Humphreys, R.L. and Sadler, L., Machine (1994). Translation: An Introductory Guide. London: Blackwells-NCC,

Gerding-Salas, C. (2000). Teaching Translation: Problems and Solutions. Translation                  Journal # 4 pp. 1-11.

Azizinezhad, M. (2006).Is Translation Teachable?Translation Journal.Volume 10 # 2.

Colina, S. (2003).Translation Teaching: from Research to the Classroom. New York:                 McGraw Hill.

Newmark,petter hand book of translation

Approval sheet

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Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

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Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

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Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

Dramatic Criticism

Module Name Dramatic Criticism
Module Code M-ThAr3021
Clustered Courses   ThAr3022: Theory of criticism-5EtCTS ThAr3023 Critical reading-5EtCTS ThAr3024: Critical analysis of Productions5EtCTS
Module EtCTS 15
Total Module Study Hour ??????????? hours 

 Module Description

This module is composed by three courses. These are Theory of criticism, critical reading & critical analysis of productions. Students can receive both theoretical and practical knowledge of criticism.

 Module Objectives

After completing these module students will be able to criticize literary works, read & analyze dramas which are written in any period and attend productions critically. 

Competency

  • Students  can  do criticism
  • Students can know dramatic styles from classical to modern
  • Students can do analysis on different productions(stage, radio, TV/screen)

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Theory of criticism (ThAr3022)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

The course focuses on definitions of Criticism, significance of criticism, requirements for critic, types of criticism and procedures to evaluate a literary work.

Objective of the course

      Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

              know definition of criticism

              learn the basic backgrounds, theories & approaches of criticism

             learn how to criticize literary works

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
Block 30 18   16   24 30 118

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will able to:

  • Understand criticism definition and theories
  •  Know theories and techniques of criticism 
  • Know how to become critic 

Course Outline:

1.      What is criticism?

2.      Expected steps from the critic

  • Reading
  • Isolation
  • Describe
  • Analysis
  • Interpreting
  • Evaluation

3.      Requirements to critic

  • Know the context
  • Present historical information
  • Present biographical information
  • Present literary information
  • Establish the relevance of information
  • Supply sufficient examples to support the conclusion

4.      Function of the critic

  • From the point view of audience
  • Establish bridge
  • Establish Standard

5.      Types of criticism

6.      Significance of criticism 

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of:

  • Assignment:20%
  •  Presentation..10%
  • Tests: 10%
  • Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark
  • Final examination: 50%

Reading Materials

     R.A. Banks – Drama and Theatre Arts

የሻውተሰማ – የተውኔትአፅናፍመነፅር

የኢ/ያብሔራዊቴአትር  – መሰረታዊየተውኔትአፃፃፍመርሖዎች

ዳንኤልተኽሉ – መባእታስነ-ፅሑፍትግርኛ

ደበበሰይñ  – የትያትርጥበብከፅሃፊተውኔትአንፃር

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ – የተውኔትድርሰትአፃፃፍዘዴ

____________ – ተውኔታዊመዝገበቃላትናብያኔዎቻቸው

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Critical reading (ThAr3023)

  • Background information
  • Module coordinator/s name____________
  • Instructor’s name __________
  • Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________
  • Email___________
  • Office number _________
  • Contact hour__________
  • Course Description:

Reading and Detail analysis of styles from different periods and genres. Classical Tragedy , the morality play. Elizabethan tragedy, Realism, Naturalism, Theatre of the absurd, epic theatre.

Objective of the course

  Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

  • understand critical readingread different styles of dramas

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
Block 30 18   16   24 30 118

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will able to:

  • Understand ways of criticism
  • Criticize work of arts
  •  analyze literary works

Course Outline:

  • Classical tragedy
  • Morality play
  • Elizabethan tragedy
  • Realism
  • Naturalism
  • Theatre of the absurd
  • Epic theatre

Mode of Assessment:

Students will be evaluated on the basis of debate, assignment (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • presentation: 
  • Assignment: 
  • Analysis :
  • Debates:
  • Tests:—-10%
  • Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.

Reading Materials

R.A Banks. (1991). Drama and Theatre Arts. 1sted.

Stephanie Arnold. (2001) The Creative Spirit. 2nded.

Sophocles .Oedipus the King.

William Shakespeare. Works of Shakespeare.

Samuel Bekette. Waiting for Godot

Wilson, Edwin. (1976). The Theater Experience. 7ht ed. Printed in United States of America.

ፋንታሁንእንግዳ፣ተውኔታዊመዝገበnላትናብያኔዎቻቸው። (1993) ብርሃንናስላምማተሚያቤትድርጅት።

___________  የተውኔትድርሰትአፃፃፍዘዴ

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE SYLLABUS/ COURSE GUIDE

Critical analysis of productions ThAr3024

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course description:

Production includes stage performance/theatre, radio drama, TV/film. To analyze all this output, critics should attend theatre, watch TV/cinema or listens radio drama. So the course emphasize on the ways that a critic follows to make criticism on such productions.

Objectives of the course

The main aims of the course are to:

  • Understand the drama critically by the way of professional point of view.
  • Clarify the techniques of analysis on TV, radio and stage drama.
  • Analyze stage, TV or radio production.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
Block 30 33   15 6 16 35 135

.Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to:

  • Comprehend the major methods of analysis professionally.
  • Understand the roles, duties and responsibility of production analyst.

Course content

PART ONE; PRODUCTION ANALYSIS; meaning, characteristics, types,

PART TWO; THEORY OF PRODUCTION ANALYSIS

PART THREE; STAGE PRODUCTIN ANALYSIS, techniques

               Of stage production analysis

 PART FOUR; TV PRODUCTION ANALYSIS, techniques

               Of TV production analysis

PART FIVE; RADIO PRODUCTION ANALYSIS, techniques

               Of RADIO production analysis

PART SIX; CRITISIZE THE SELECTIVE TV, RADIO AND STAGE

               PRODUCTION

PART SEVEN; FINAL PRESENTATION

Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 5%
  • Test (3) = 15%
  • Assignment =15%
  •  Project proposal =25%
  •  Final presentation=40%

         Total =100%

  • Reading Materials
  • Silver, Directing play, 2005. New York. Mc-Graw –Hill companies, inc.
  • Play directing,, . 5th ed. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc..

                                               Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

 Public communication

Module Name Public communication
Module Code M-ThAr4011
Clustered Courses   1. Mass communication (ThAr4012) – 5ECTS 2. Public attachment (ThAr4013) – 10 ECTS
ECTS 15
Total Module Study Hour 305
  • Module Description

This module encompasses two courses: i.e. Mass communication and Public attachment. Mass communication is designed for students who need to learn basic concept in the discipline of mass communication. They will acquire the basic knowledge about the communication field. The course equally empowers to join intellectual discourse on the nature, functions and effects of mass communication in the society .On the other hand, Public attachment course, Final year students will give Theoretical lectures on playwriting, Acting and Directing to high school students, Kebele youth association, and Private Theater clubs. They also involve in practical assignment. They first select one act plays and other materials; cast trainees; Produce variety show ;present the performance to school community and produce report about the entire activities.

  • Module Objective

At the end of the course, student should be able: 

  • Be fully exposed to the rudiments and basics of mass communication as a sub set of human communication.
  • Be acquainted with the contents and characteristics of various types of media of mass communication as well as its adjunct.
  • Have been exposed to various forms, models, elements and nature of mass communication.
  • Doing one act play.
  • Competency

This is a course that ushers you into the discipline of mass communication and gives you a concise and appreciable understanding of the concept of mass communication and its position and role in the society. The course is packaged on a global scale with a view to positioning the students on a pedestal that would make them at par with any entrant into the field of mass communication anywhere in the world.

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

 Mass communication (ThAr4012)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour_________

  • Course description

The course is deals with the concept, theories, elements and modes of mass communication. In the course the function of public relation, the impact of mass communication on the society will discussed. Various types of media of mass communication and their role for human communication of different place will covered.

           Objectives of the course

  • Be fully exposed to the rudiments and basics of mass communication as a sub set of human communication.
  • Be acquainted with the contents and characteristics of various types of media of mass communication as well as its adjunct.
  • Have been exposed to various forms, models, elements and nature of mass communication.

       Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 270 hours. Of this time, 60 hours is allocated for lectures, 38 hours for assignments, 30 hours for presentation, 40 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 32 hours for assessment and 70 hours for independent study.

 Learning Outcomes

This course is for students who need to learn basic concept in the discipline of   mass communication.  They will acquire the basic knowledge about the communication field. The course equally empowers for the students to join intellectual discourse on the nature, functions and Effects of mass communication in the society.

By this course, students will gain the basic understanding of mass Communication as a form of human communication and the functions and components of its various media.

  Course Contents  

CHAPTER ONE; FOUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION; Understanding the  

                   Concept of communication and mass communication, Nature and

                   Characteristics of communication, Elements of the communication process,

                   Modes of communication, Theories of mass communication and function of

                   Mass communication.

CHAPTER TWO; MASS COMMUNICATION THEORY; Two-step theory, Gate keeper

                   Theory, Agenda- setting theory.

CHAPTER THREE; FORMS AND CONTEXT OF COMMUNICATION; Verbal

                  Communication, Intra and public communication and cross culture,

                   International communication.

CHAPTER FOUR; MEDIA OF COMMUNICATION; Print media (Books, News paper,

                  Magazine), Broad cast media (Television and Radio), Narrow cast media

                  (Film and cinema, cable television) and Online media (online newspaper and

                  Magazines, Internet Radio)

CHAPTER FIVE; IMPACT OF MASS MEDIA; Media effects Theories, Concept, Development

                              And Functions of Public Relations Concept, Development and Functions of Advertising Effects of the Mass Media on the Society.

CHAPTER SIX; MEANNING AND SCOPE OF PUBLIC RELATION; Definition and

                        Components of public relations, Functions and careers of public relation.

CHAPTER SEVEN; THEORIES OF PUBLIC RELATION; Theories of Relationship (System and

                       Situational theory, Theories of Persuasion and Social influence (Social exchange,

                      Diffusion and social learning theory), Theories of mass communication (Uses and

                      Gratification, Framing and Agenda Setting Theory).

CHAPTER EHIGHT; PUBLIC RELATION AND SOCIETY; The role of public relation

                       In Society, Ethics in Public relations, Writing and Speaking in Public Relation

                     (Challenges of writing and speaking in public relations, Editing and proof Reading,

                     The press release and the process of successful Public relations speeches)

Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 5%
  • Test (3) = 15%
  • Assignment  one =10%
  • Assignment  two =20%
  •  Final  Exam =50%

         Total =100%

Reading Materials

Blumler, J., & Katz, E. (1974). The Uses of Mass Communications.

Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications.

CCMS-Infobase. (2003). Mass Media: Effects Research – Uses and

Gratifications. Retrieved October 10, 2005, from http://www.

cultsock.ndirect. co.uk/MUHome/cshtml/media/

DeFleur, M. L. & Ball-Rokeach, S. J. (1989). Theories of Mass

Communication (5th ed). New York: Longman.

Littlejohn, S. W. (1999). Theories of Human Communication (6th ed).

Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

West, R., & Turner, L. H. (2000). Introducing Communication Theory:

Analysis and Application. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield. Page332.

Wood, J. T. (1997). Communication Theories in action: An Introduction.

Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.223

                                                Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————-                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature                                                                                       

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

1. Public attachment (ThAr4013)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour_______

Course description

This course designed to enable students to go out from their compound and meet with secondary school students or amateurs around their compound. And they will teach them fundamentals of theatre and staging verity shows.

Objectives of the course

The main aim of this course is after knowing the discipline students expect to do for practice out of campus specially, school and artistic amateur club. This is student’s apparent time.

  • To enable students gain teaching and learning experiences
  • To enable students select one act plays and other materials of stage presentation.
  • To familiarize students with staging variety shows.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

III. Learning Outcomes

This course is for students who need to learn basic concept in the discipline of   public attachment.  They will acquire the basic knowledge about the practical relation with out of campus. The course equally empowers for the students to join intellectual discourse on the practical form of the field i.e. theater arts and film study.

  Course Contents  

PART  ONE; Giving orientation about their assignments and related problems

PART  TWO; Assigning a group of students in different high school

PART  THREE; Evaluating the course outline prepared by each of the groups of students

PART  FOUR; Attending classes being conducted by students and evaluating their participation

PART  FIVE; Scrutinizing the scripts proposed by  each group for final production

PART  SIX; Attending rehearsals and evaluating the stage presentations(performance) of each

                   Group.         

PART SEVEN; preparation and presentation of reports.

Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 10%
  • Assignment  one =20%
  • Assignment  two =20%
  •  Final  Exam(production) =50%

         Total =100%

 Reading Materials

                                                    Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

Senior Essay/project

Module Name Senior Essay/project
Module Code M-ThAr4021
Course Name Senior Essay/project
Course Code ThAr4021
ECTS 5
Total Module Study Hour 135

MODULE GUIDE BOOK /SYLLABUS/

 Module description

The module concentrated on how to do undergraduate programme research paper, especially Theatre arts and Film discipline. In addition, based on the theoretical aspects   students can do research paper. Optionally, fully length scripts (stage, TV/film and radio drama), productions (stage, TV/film and radio drama) are acceptable like senior essay.

Module/Course Objectives

The aim of this module to aspirate for students to do research oriented Artistic works.

Understand the steps through which the research process progresses and knowledge of the purposes and functions of each these steps for the whole research and using the finding of the research as problem solving tools on the area of the research’s.

Competency/Learning Outcomes

Up on successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Identify different artistic works critically and criticize based on professional point of view.
  • Understand artistic research works what look like.
  • In Ethiopia different traditional ceremony practiced but it couldn’t dramatize due to lack of knowledge in drama. Therefore, in order to protect the culture students do research oriented cultural drama.
  • Comprehend the major methods of  research
  • Apply  Artistic research methods to the study of Theater arts and Film studies
  • Analyze the problems of various theatrical and filmmaking issues in the field and put the finding.   
  1. Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

Interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning will be used. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 10 hours is allocated for lectures,35 hours for independent study, 19 hours for assignments, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for counseling and assessment and 20 hours for presentation.

COURSE SYLLABUS/ COURSE GUIDE

Senior Essay/project ThAr4021

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description

The module concentrated on how to do undergraduate programme research paper, especially Theatre arts and Film discipline. In addition, based on the theoretical aspects   students can do research paper. Optionally, fully length scripts (stage, TV/film and radio drama), productions (stage, TV/film and radio drama) are acceptable like senior essay.

Objectives of the course

The main aims of the course are to:

  • Identify the principles, importance, techniques, procedures and format of research and report writingpracticaly.
  •  Identify the principles, systems and different types of citation of bibliography practically.
  • Expect to do research paper for the fulfillment of Bachelor of Arts.
  • To solve different kinds of problems in the sector of the discipline.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

.Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to:

  • Comprehend the major methods of Artistic research together with their characteristics, advantages and limitations.
  • Skills of identifying research topics and appropriate research methods for the topics selected.
  • Skills of spotting, accessing and selecting appropriate source materials.
  • Skills of outlining, composing and recomposing as well as editing research paper.
  • The ability to document sources used in an adequate and consistent manner.

Course content

PART ONE; RESEARCH PROPOSAL; meaning and procedure of research proposal, format of

Research project proposal.

PART TWO; TITLE SELECTION; students choose their own topics for Research paper or Project

PART THREE; Doing research or project proposal based on their selective title

PART FOUR; First Phase counselling, chapter one or first draft

PART FIVE; Second Phase counselling, chapter two or second draft

PART SIX; Third Phase counselling, chapter Three and Four or Final draft

PART SEVEN; Final presentation of paper or project

  Mode of Assessment

A Combination of different task will be used in assessing students

Performance and achievements;

  • Attendance and class Participation = 5%
  • Selecting Title= 10%
  •  Project proposal =20%
  • Follow up Evaluation  =15%
  • Final Senior Essay/project=50%

         Total =100%

  • Reading Materials
  • Best, w.Jhon and khan v.JamesResearch in education. (2007)
  • Chara, s. Research methodology statistical method. (2007)
  • Hot, k. paul and goode, J.W. Methods in social research. (2005)
  • Parkash, Ravi Methods of educational research. (2005)

 Productions

Module Name productions  
Module Code M-ThAr 4031
Clustered Courses   1.ThAr4032stageproduction                                              2.ThAr4033Tvandfilmproduction                           3.ThAr 4034Radio production
Module ECTS 30
Total Module Study Hour 900 hours

 Module Description

This module comprises   of three production courses. namely: stage production , film  and Tv production and Radio Production. All courses comprises under this module have  both theoretical and  practical contents that help students to implement  theoretical  science of the medium  to practical.  The first course in the module is stage production. it  is full of practical content  course ,which involve  different kind of  practical  rehearsal periods. Starting from play selection up to final stage production. and  the  Second  course under this module film and Television production(FTV), which is  designed  to familiarize students with both theoretical and operational knowledge  of screen  medium . The third  course clustered under this module is radio production. This course basically involves the uniqueness of radio production Skills as an art form, in contrast with others. Moreover, the way of making radio production, the basic element of the medium will be looked at.

 Module Objectives

After successful completion of  this module, students will get necessary  theoretical and operational skills of stage, film ,television and radio production.   

Competency

  • Understand key concepts of production.
  • Appreciate, evaluate and analyze productions.
  • Understand the major theoretical and practical perspectives of theatre, TV, film and radio  productions.

COURSE SYLLABUS/ COURSE GUIDE

Stage production ThAr4032

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

The course involves the students in a full scale production work emulating as closely as possible the intensity of work encountered by professional actors and technicians. The production would be more demanding (than production I) both artistically and technically. Students will tour with their production to address for different audience.

Objectives of the course

Overall, this course is devoted to familiarize students with theoretical knowledge and practical phases of theatre production. Through participating them on different role among production crew.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 305 hours. Of this time, 220  hours is allocated for  rehearsals(group and individual), 40 hours for  play and character analysis assignments, 10 hours for presentation, 20 hours for  problem solving sessions and assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Learning Outcomes

After the module is completed, the students will be able to:

  • Understand key concepts of Theatre production, such as play selection, play analysis and different kind off play rehearsals.
  • Differentiate the role between theatre personnel practically.
  • Distinguish the different between theatre rehearsals.
  • Able to Appreciate, Analyze play productions.
  • Expand their knowledge of acting, directing, writing and other technical personnel, through their practical participation.

Contents

  • Section one: play selection :selecting production play based up on internal (artistic quality of the work)and external ,role selections.
  • Section two: rehearsals: Focusing on different kind of rehearsals .namely: play analysis, reading, rehearsal, blocking (line or on stage) rehearsal, dress rehearsal, technical rehearsal, opening night.
  • Section three: final production: final presentation of production for assessment and audiences.

Mode of Assessment

  • Assignment I: This assignment requires students to read selected play critically and make general analysis on it. It will account 10% of the total mark.
  • Assignment II: this assignment requires students to make analysis on their role within a production and present to class. This assignment will account for 15% (10% submission and 5% presentation) of total course mark.
  •  Attendance will account 15 of  total mark
  • Final examination (final production): Students will present production with its full technical aspects, which will account  60% of the total course mark.

Reading Materials

Silver,Directing play, 2005. New York. Mc-Graw –Hill companies, inc.

Play directing,, . 5th ed. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————–

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

 Film and Television  production (ThAr 4033)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Course Description:

In this course TV/film productions are expected in fewer amounts of costs. Among those productions which are prepared by students, the best one should be exhibited for the compass community. It may also get airtime coverage from TV/cinema which is facilitated by department or university with concerned body.

Objective of the course

Generally, the objective of this course is to provide   students   with practical and industry relevant skills  as well as operational practice combined with theoretical knowledge of film and television production skills. namely: acting, directing  and writing and other professions .moreover, Students will able to use the medium equipments properly. such us:video camera, light(studio and outdoor) .etc.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning (production). The total study hours allocated for this course is 270  hours. Of this time, 60 hours is allocated for lectures, 12 hours forindividual  assignments, 70 hours for productions , 50 hours for lab tutorials ,screening and problem solving sessions, 25 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Learning Outcomes

After successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

         Identify and  Explain major history of screen production.                                                                        

  • Explain the general theories  of both television and film production.
  • Develop necessary skills in directing,writing and acting  for screen production.
  • Know how to use FTV production equipments.
  • Develop fluency and analytical skills in film making crafts.
  • familiar with other unscripted screen production. such as non narrative film production, news, documentaries, interviews etc.
  • Describe and apply basics of film making concepts and grammars.
  • Be ready to work in film and Television sectors.

Course Contents

  • Section  One:what is film history: the invention and early years  of the screen medium,late silent era ,the rise of Hollywood,the advent of television,the coming of sound, color film,                                                                                                                  sectiontwo:screen medium as an art form : unique characteristics of the medium in relative  with others art forms will be looked at.
  • Sectionthree:film and television production kinds:fictional feature film and documentery , different kind of television productions: news,tvdramas,interviews  and their  kinds ,unique characteristics of it will be covered.
  • Section three:screenmediumproductionphases:preproduction,production,post production.
  • Section four:basic concepts of screen medium and FTV Grammar:framing,kind of camramovement,type of shoot and their opretion. 

.Mode of Assessment

  • Assignment: Students are required to select and come up with a proposal  topic(program) for television or  film production:documentery,Tvnews,different kind of Tv dramas or other scripted and unscripted productions . This  assignment will account   10%  of total mark.
  • Test: will account 30% of the total mark
  • Quiz: will account 10 of the total mark
  • Final Examination(Tv or short film production) :  will account for 50% of the total mark.

Reading Materials

  • Boordwell,David and thompson,Kristin.filmHistory;Anintroduction,Thirdedition,Boston;MG Graw-hil.2010 .
  • Cleve,Bastian.film production management,focal press:2005
  • Lo brutto,Vincent.The filmmakers guide to production design,thirdedition,newyork,Allworth press,2002.
  • Rain,road.American cinematograph,7thedition,California.the ASC press Hoolwod,1993.
  • Sarat ,Austin…etal.Law on the screen,California university press,2005.

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Radio productions ThAr 4034

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

 Course Description:

This module discusses the theory and operation of both scripted and unscripted radio productions. At the end, preparing 30 minute to an hour studio production is mandatory to fulfil the course successfully. From these group works, best radio drama can get the chance of transmitting by radio in the behalf of department or university by taking agreement with radio station.

Objective of the module/Course

The core aim of this module is to equip students with the skills necessary for successful participation in any radio production. Overall, to develop the students’ skills, techniques and art of radio productions. Thus: Writing, acting and directing  for  radio drama and participating as other  technical personnel on radio productions, as well as to make students familiar with the use of  radio production equipments. namely: microphone  and sound recording machines .

Competency/Learning Outcomes

After the completion of this course, students should know:

Different kinds of acting styles.

Characterization, stage movement, believable acting and role distribution have been considered.

  • The historical  historical background of radio product  Know the difference and similarities  between  kind of radio productions: radio drama, radio news, reporting, radio promotion, radio interviews and their unique characteristics.                                                                                                    
  •  Develop practical skills, techniques and art of radio productions. Such as; radio dramas, radio news, interviews, documentaries etc.
  • Know the techniques of using radio production equipments.

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 30 hours is allocated for lectures, 29 hours for radio production  assignments, 5 hours for production presentation, 20 hours for tutorials, lab and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Contents

  • Sectionone: historical back ground of radio productions.
  • Section two: Radio production and its kind with its specific principle. Radio news, radio promotions, radio interviews, radiotolkshows.
  • SectionThree:radiodramas:deffrent kind of radio dramas and their principles,writin,acting and directing for ears .
  • Section Four:.Eqiupments for radio productions.namely:microphone,recording machines, sound mixer etc,
  • Section five: radio production phases.
  1. Mode of Assessment
  2. Assignment: Students are expected to prepare radio production program proposal and  present their proposal  to the class. This assignment will account for 10  of total course mark.
  3. Test: 30% of the total marks
  4. Quiz: will account 10% of the total mark
  5.  Final production: 50% of the total mark.
  1. Reading Materials

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                              Signature

                               COMMON COURSE/SUPPORTIVE

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

Communicative English (Enga 10111)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Objective of the course

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Develop their ability to use English in spoken and written discourse,
  • Utilize a range of strategies for learning vocabulary,
  • Listen and read and understand both spoken and written texts,
  • Analyze grammar in real texts
  • Write paragraphs considering different purposes and readers

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
parallel                

Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Exercise essay writing,
  • Develop listening, reading & speaking skills on English language

Course Outline:

Unit One: Culture and Tradition

        1.1. Speaking and Listening

  • Getting to know each other and finding out about each other
  • Pre-course Discussion Starter Activities.
    • Reading
  • Culture and Tradition
    • Vocabulary

               – Building one’s Vocabulary

    – Strategies of vocabulary development

   – Guessing meaning from context

         1.4.    Writing

 – The planning of effective writing (thinking, planning, drafting, revising)

 – Paragraph writing (description) incorporating the learning from Reading

Unit Two:  Gender Issue

           2.1. Speaking and Listening

                – Finding out Opinions

             – agreeing and disagreeing; debating

  • Reading
  • Gender issue
    • Grammar

– Reported Speech

  • Vocabulary

                – Word meaning

2.5. Writing

 – Paragraph writing incorporating the learning from Reading

Unit Three:  Science and Agriculture

             3.1. Speaking and Listening

                –  Expressing Warning and Offering advice

  • Reading

             – Science and Agriculture

              3.3. Grammar

              – Active and Passive voice

  • Vocabulary

                – Word meaning

3.5. Writing

  • –  process Writing (with focus on sequence, clarity, …)
  • – How to make/do things (e.g. making coffee, making injera, …)
  •  

Unit Four:  A Slave Witness of a Slave Auction

             4.1. Speaking and Listening

             –  Story telling

  • Reading

                          – A Slave Witness of a Slave Auction

            4.3. Grammar

                          –   Tense Revision- past simple and present perfect

                 4.4. Vocabulary

                – Words from the text

            4.5. Writing

                          – Developing a short narrative text.

Unit Five:  Corruption and Development

           5.1. Speaking and Listening

             –  Crime and Punishment (discussion)

  • Reading

                          – Corruption and   Development

            5.3. Grammar

                          –   Expressing Obligation/Necessity Using Modals

  • Vocabulary

                – Word Formation

5.5. Writing

 – Developing a short expository text.

Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of debate, assignment (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Debates: by forming groups students will select one argumentative issue and make debates. . This will account for 20 % of total mark.
  • Assignment: Essay writing on any topics. This will account 10 % of total mark.
  • Tests:—-10%
  • Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.

Reading Materials

References:

The students are advised to read widely. However, the following are desirable:

  1. Longman. English Skills with Reading. 1995. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
    1. Gordon, H.H. Developing College Writing: From Substance to Style. 1989.  New York: St. Martin’s Press.
    1. John, A. College English 1 and 2. 196?.  Addis Ababa: AAU Printing Press.
    1. Thorne, S. Mastering Advanced English Language. 1997. Macmillan Press Ltd
    1. Verderber, R.  Communicate. 1987. Wadsworth Publishing Company.

________.  The Challenge of Effective Speaking. 1985.California, USA

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

Course Title: Writing Skills

Course Code:EnLa 222

Credit point:  5 EtCTS

Rationale:

To master the skill of effective communication, trainees need, among others to master paragraph writing. This can create an opportunity to learn their major area courses while they stay in the university. Moreover, it enables the learners to communicate their ideas in writing proficiently in English.

Course Description:

Factors in writing: right attitude, prewriting techniques, outlining, revising and proof reading; the paragraph structure: topic sentence, controlling idea, position of the topic sentence in the paragraph, mistakes in writing the topic sentence, major supports, details; unity, support, coherence, and sentence skills; methods of paragraph organization: time order, emphatic order, and spatial order, connectors, transitional sentences, pronouns, sentence variety, repetition; the modes of discourse: definition, illustration, comparison-contrast, analogy, cause-effect, process, division and classification, description, narration, persuasion and argumentation; essay structure: introduction, common  methods of introduction, thesis, plan of development,  body paragraphs, and methods of conclusion.

Course Objectives:

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Identify the basic steps in the writing process;

Analyze paragraphs for unity, support, coherence and sentence skills;

Master the basics of writing expository, narrative, descriptive, and argumentative texts; and

Write effective texts.

Course Contents:

Unit One: The Writing Process

1.   The Writing Anxiety

2.    Strategies for handling writing anxiety

·        Have a positive anxiety

·        Understand the writing context

·        Recognize the writing context

·        Know the subject well

3    Pre writing techniques

·        Free writing

·        Listing/ brainstorming/bulleting

·        Cubing

·        Clustering/mapping/webbing

·        Journalistic questions

·        Dictionaries, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia

4. Outlining

5. Drafting and revising

Unit Two: Paragraph Development

         1. Paragraph structure

         2.. Topic sentence

                2.1. Supporting sentences

                2.2. Errors in writing topic sentences

Unit Three: Basic Elements of Writing

             1. Unity

             2. Organization and coherence

                   2.1. Organization

                   2.2. Cohesive devices

                   2.3. Types of transitions

                   2.4. Transition markers

             3. Supporting details

                  3.3.1. The importance of specific details

                  3.3.2. The importance of adequate details

             4. Effective sentence skills

Unit Four: Modes of Paragraph Development

             4.. Exposition

                 4.1. Defining

                 4.2. Providing examples

                 4.3. Explaining a process

                 4.4 Comparing and contrasting

                 4.5. Providing causes and effects

                 4.6. Dividing and classifying

                     4.7. Narration

                 4.8. Description

                4.9. Persuasion and argumentation

Unit Five: Introduction to essay writing

1.       Difference between paragraph and essay

2.      Parts of an essay

              3.      Introductory Paragraph

              4.      Supporting paragraphs

              5.    Concluding paragraph

Methodology:

·         Individual work

·         Paragraph writing

·         Essay writing

·         Group work

·         Pyramiding

·         Paragraph and essay analysis

Assessment:

·         Writing assignments………………20%

·         Peer assessment…………………..15%

·         Mid-semester exam……………….25%

·         Final examination…………………40%

References:

Gordon, H. H. 1989. Developing College Writing: From Substance to Style .New York: 

St. Martin’s Press.

Langan, J.1995. English Skills with Reading .New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc

__________. 1985. College Writing Skills with Readings. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Dougherty, B.N. 1985. Composting Choices for Writers: A Cross-Disciplinary Rhetoric. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Flower, H.R. 1983. The Little, Brown Handbook. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

Guth, H.P. 1989. The Writer’s Agenda: The Wadsworth Writer’s Guide (Shorter Edition). California:  Wordsworth Publishing Company.

Hammond, E.R. 1985. Informative Writing.New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Hyland, K. 2003. Second Language Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hughes, D.M. Louise K.L. and Richard W.C.1985. Glencoe English 12: Composition Speech  and Grammar. California: Glencoe Publishing Company.

 ______ .1985. Glencoe English 11: Composition Speech and Grammar. California: 

                Glencoe Publishing Company.

                                 .1985. Glencoe English 10: Composition Speech and Grammar. California:   Glencoe Publishing Company.

Tibbettes, C. and A.M. Tibbetts. 1981. Strategies: A Rhetoric and Reader. Dallas: Scott, 

Foreman and Company.

Troyka, L.Q 1996. Simon Schuster and Handbook for Writers. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Wiener, H.S. 1984. Creating Compositions. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Course Title:  Information Technology

Course Code: Comp 402

Credit Hours:         2

 Course Rationale

Today’s life style is highly interrelated with computers. Especially it is true for journalists where computer literacy is indispensable to this highly competitive market. Thus, this course is designed to acquaint students with necessary computer skills.

 Course Description

An introduction to computer software packages commonly used in Journalistic research and expression Experience with using the Internet and other library resources for research Different Types of systems used at the work place such as Manual, mechanical, computerized and automated systems shall be introduced briefly.  Emphasis is put on computerized systems.  Components of a computer system:  Data, software, hardware, and human ware are discussed in some detail.

The windows operating system is used for file, disk, and memory management tasks.  Students are provided with work sheets that cover different aspects of the windows environment.

In the 3rd part of the course, word processing (WORD 97) is used to create, edit, format and further work on text document that includes pictures, organizational charts, and drawings.

Course Content

Chapter 1: Introduction

  Uses of computers

  What is a computer?

  1.2.1         An information processor

  1.2.2          Digital vs. analogue information

   1.2.3          Measurement of digital information

   Characteristics of computers

 Types of computers

  1.4.1         Special purpose vs. general purpose

  1.4.2        Microcomputers, minicomputers, mainframes, supercomputers

1.5               Brief history of development of computers

1.6              Trends in computer development

1.7                Hardware vs. Software

1.8              Peripherals

1.8.1        Transfer information to/from computer

1.8.2        Input, output and storage peripherals

1.9              The System Unit

 1.9.1        What does it do?

 1.9.2        Connecting up the system unit

 1.9.3        inside the system unit:

 1.9.3.1   Safety: switch off power and earth yourself first

1.9.3.2  Mother board, CPU, mouths co-processor, RAM chips, floppy disk drive, hard disk drive, CD-ROM drive, ROM chips, speaker, expansion slots

1.10          File systems

1.10        Files and folders – what are they?

The hierarchical file system

1.11            Operating systems

         1.11.1      Definition

  • Examples: DOS, Windows 98 etc

Chapter 2: Windows 2000

2.1   The Windows 2000 Environment

2.1.1    Graphical User Interface (GUI)

2.1.2     The desktop

2.1.3     Windows

2.1.3.1    Basic parts

  • Minimizing, maximizing and resizing

2.2              The ‘My Computer’ icon

2.2.1         Formatting floppy disks

2.2.2           Managing your files

2.2.2.1    Make new folders

2.2.2.2    Always create your files/folders inside ‘My Documents’

2.2.2.3    Cut/copy and paste files/folders

2.2.2.4    Delete files/folders

2.2.2.5    Rename files/folders

2.3             The Recycle Bin

2.3.1          Restoring files

2.3.2           Emptying

2.4                 Accessories

2.4.1         WordPad

2.4.1.1    Creating and saving files

      2.4.1.2    Entering text

2.4.2          Paint

2.4.3              Calculator

2.5                 Customizing your desktop

2.5.1            Moving/resizing the taskbar

2.5.2            Changing the date/time

2.5.3            Changing the background

2.5.4            Changing the screen saver

2.5.4.1    3D Text screen saver

2.6              Finding files/folders

2.7               Windows Explorer

2.7.1         Basics

2.7.2          Cut/copy and paste files/folders

2.7.3           Delete files/folders

2.7.4          Renaming files/folders

2.7.5           Creating new folders

2.8                 Computer viruses

2.8.1   What is a computer virus?

2.8.2    Anti-virus software

2.8.3    Running a virus scan

Chapter 3: Microsoft Word

3.1    Word processor basics

3.2      Parts of the Word window

3.3      Creating new documents

3.4       Paragraphs

3.5       Typing and editing text

3.5.1   Selecting text

3.5.2    Deleting text

3.5.3    Copy/cut and paste

3.6    Saving and opening documents

3.7     Find and replace text

3.8    Using the toolbars

3.9    Screen display options (normal, web layout, print layout, zoom)

3.10 Changing text appearance

Font, size, style, color, effects (including subscript and

             Superscript)

3.11    Formatting

3.11.1        Borders and shading

3.11.2        Text justification

3.11.3        Indentation of text

3.12            The Page Setup dialogue box

3.12.1        Setting page margins

3.12.2        Changing paper orientation

3.13            Inserting Page breaks

3.14            Headers and footers

3.15           Bullets and numbering

3.16            Inserting Symbols and Special Characters

  • Tables

3.17.1       Inserting tables

3.17.2       Add/remove rows/columns

3.17.3        Selecting rows/columns/cells

3.17.4        Splitting and merging cells

3.17.5        Formatting text within cells

3.17.5   Text alignment and direction

3.18          Adding graphics

3.18.1        from a file

3.18.2        Clip Art

3.18.3        Word Art

Chapter 4: Introduction to the Internet

4.1      Basics and terminology

4.2       Setting up an email account

4.3       Using a search engine

Methodology:

·      Teacher presentation

·       Group discussion

·       Problem solving

·        Demonstration

Assessment:

·      Continuous assessment and quizzes ……………………50%

·        Final practical exam…………………………………………..50%

References:

“Computer Essentials”, Hutchinson and Sawyer

“Modern Microcomputers”, Erickson and Vonk

 Course Title:    Psychology

Course Code:  Psyc 211
Credit point:  5 EtCTS

 Course Rationale

The science of behavior and cognitive process emerged as independent field of study when ideas from philosophy applied by scientists in other fields to the task of understanding human behavior. This course will serve as introductory to the rest of the major courses and will focus on aspects related to the development of psychology as a science.

 Course Description

This course introduces students the meaning and major topics in psychology including perspectives in psychology, fields of psychology, research methods in psychology, and biological and social factors influencing behavior, sensation, perception, and attitude. Moreover, psychological constructs such as interest, intelligence, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, psychopathology and professional ethics in the field of psychology.

Course Objectives: 

After completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the meaning and sub fields of psychology
  • Explain the research methods employed in pursuit of psychological knowledge.
  • Differentiate the basic tenets of different schools of thought in psychology.
  • Describe the biological and social factors influencing behavior.
  • Discuss how learning takes place
  • Elaborate the process of memory
  • Explain the dynamics of motivation and emotion.
  • Use different learning theories and concepts for practical sessions
  • Discuss personality.
  • Describe the nature of major psychological disorders. 
  •  Use psychological theories and methods to explain human behavior and development

Course Contents:

Unit One: The Essence of Psychology

1.1.      Meaning of psychology

1.2.      Historical Roots of psychology – Early and Modern Perspectives

1.3.      Research Methods in psychology

1.4.      Sub – fields in psychology

Unit Two: Sensations and Perception

2.1. Sensation and the senses

2.2. Perception

2.3. Perceptual Organization

                             2.3.1. Depth and Distance Perception

                             2.3.2. Movement perception

                             2.3.3. Visual Constancy; when seeing is believing

                             2.3.4. Visual Illusions; when seeing is misleading

    2.4. Extrasensory Perception: Reality or Illusion?

Unit Three: Learning

3.1. Meaning and Nature of Learning

3.2. Classical conditioning

3.3. Operant conditioning

3.4. Cognitive Learning

3.5. Factors affecting Learning

Unit Four: Memory

                  4.1. The nature of Memory

                  4.2. Memory Structure

                            4.2.1. Sensory register /Sensory Memory

          4.2.2. Short Term Memory

           4.2.3. Long Term Memory

              4.3. Forgetting

              4.4.The Information Processing Approach

              4.5. Improving Memory: Some Strategies

Unit Five: Motivation and Emotion

               5.1. Motivation

                            5.1.1. Nature of Motivation

                            5.1.2. Classification of Motives

                            5.1.3. Theories of Motivation

                            5.1.4. Conflicts of Motives and frustration

               5.2. Emotion

                            5.2.1. Nature of Emotion

                            5.2.2. Components of Emotions

                            5.2.3. Theories of Emotion

Unit Six: Stress

               6.1. Nature of Stress

6.2.Types of stressors

               6.3. Responses to Stress and Stressors

               6.4. Factors that influence stressfulness of events

               6.5. Coping with Stress

Unit Seven: Personality

               7.1. Defining personality

               7.2. Personality theories and Approaches

                            7.2.1. Psychodynamic theories

                            7.2.2. Type and Trait Theories

               7.3. Measurements of personality

Unit Eight: Industrial Psychology

               8.1. Defining Industrial Psychology

               8.2. Focal areas in Industrial Psychology

Unit Nine: Social Psychology

               9.1. Defining Social Psychology

               9.2. Focal areas in Social Psychology

Unit Ten: Psychology of Abnormality and Psychotherapy

               10.1. Definitions of abnormality

               10.2. Perspectives on abnormal behavior

               10.3. Classification and description of psychological disorders

               10.4. Treatment of psychological disorders

Assessment:

        Lecture

        Demonstration

        Group discussion

        Individual and group presentation

        Brain storming

        Field observation

Assessment and evaluation procedures

        Quiz ……………………………. 10

        Group Assignment……………… 10

        Individual Work …………………20

        Mid-term exam …………………. 20

        Final exam ……………………….40

References:

Colman, Andrew M. (2009). A Dictionary of Psychology. Oxford: OUP. Oxford Paperback Reference.

Gross, Richard. (2005). Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour. United Kingdom: Hodder Arnold Publication. 5th Revised edition edition (Paperback)

Kalat, James W. (2007). Introduction to Psychology (Paperback). USA: Wadsworth Publishing; 8 edition

Smith, Edward , Susan Nolen-Hoeksema and Barbara Fredrickson.(2003). Atkinson and Hilgard’s Introduction to Psychology. United Kingdom: Wadsworth Publishing Co Inc; 14th Revised edition.

Wittig, Arno (1977) Schaum’s Outline of Introduction to Psychology (Paperback). USA: McGraw-Hill; 2 edition.

 If the acting or performance of the theatre courses is mainly in Amharic the following courses shall replace the Tigrigna courses which have already been given in the pages before

COURSE GUIDE/SYLLABUS

INTRODUCTION TO CIVIC AND ETHICAL EDUCATION (CvEt  10112)

Background information

Module coordinator/s name____________

Instructor’s name __________

Phone no.: Mobile____________ Office ___________

Email___________

Office number _________

Contact hour__________

Objective of the course

At the end of this course, students will be:

  • familiar with  key concepts like civics, ethics and profession,
  • equipped with basic knowledge, skills and attitude of socio-economic and political issues of their country,
  • familiar with government institutions, policies, strategies and legal provisions of their country,
  • able to analyze the dynamics of socio-economic and political transformations of their country,
  • able to develop the knowledge of work habit; professional, environmental, development and public service ethics, and their repercussions,
  • familiarized with foundations of democracy and good governance and tools of democratization process,
  • able to assess the values of multi-culturalism and tolerance for mutual understandings and co-existence, and
  •  able to gain an increased awareness of the opportunities and challenges of globalization

Mode of Delivery and Study Hour

The mode of delivery for this course is interactive teaching and learning, independent learning and collaborative learning. The total study hours allocated for this course is 135 hours. Of this time, 48 hours is allocated for lectures, 19 hours for assignments, 15 hours for presentation, 20 hours for tutorials and problem solving sessions, 16 hours for assessment and 35 hours for independent study.

Mode of delivery Lectures Project Work Field/lab work Presentation Tutorials Assessment Independent study Total Study Hours
parallel                
  1. Learning Outcomes

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Know what civic and ethic mean,
  • Act ethically
  • Get patriotic feelings

Course Outline:

Chapter One: Civics and Ethics for Professionals

  1. Conceptual frame work of Civics and Ethics
    1. Civics, Ethics and Citizenship
    1. Relations of Ethics, Civics and Profession
    1. The development of civics, ethics and profession in Ethiopia
    1. Examining major value challenges 
    1. Rights and Duties of Citizens

Chapter Two: Perspectives on Society, State and Government in Ethiopia

         2.1. Introduction

         2. 2. Ethiopia: Society, state, regimes and governments

         2.3. Dynamics of civics and ethics in socio-economic and political transformations  

  • from Untarism to Federalism
    • from Presidentialism to Parliamentarism
    • from Mono-culturalism to Multiculturalism
    • from Mono-party centralism to Multi-partism
    • from Constitution to Constitutionalism

    2.4. Major developments and challenges of these dynamics

Chapter Three: Ethics and Civic Dispositions in Ethiopia

3.1. Introduction

3.2. Work habit and professional Ethics 

   3.3. The Ethics and Civics of Development

   3.4. The Ethics and Civics of Public Service

   3.5. The Ethics and Civics of Environment

   3.6. Rights and obligations in Development, Public Service and Environment

Chapter Four: Democracy and Good Governance in Ethiopia

    4.1. Introduction

    4.2. Foundations of Democracy and Good Governance

    4.3. Examination of Civic Culture and Political Spectrum in Ethiopia

    4.4. The Individual and the Collective Setting of Democracy and Good Governance

    4.5. Rights and Obligations in Democracy and Good Governance

Chapter Five: Globalization

5.1. Introduction

            5. 2. Globalization and the changing world

5. 3. Dimensions and Values of Globalization

                5. 4. Major Actors of Globalization

            5. 5. Challenges of Globalization in developing countries

            5. 6. Ethiopia: a state in a globalized world. 

             5.7. Global Citizenship

  • Mode of Assessment

Students will be evaluated on the basis of presentation, a term paper (which they will write following all standards of academic writing) and a final examination.

  • Debates: by forming groups students will select one argumentative issue and make debates. . This will account for 20 % of your total mark.
  • Assignment: students will select one Script or performance of screen, radio or stage drama and do analysis on aesthetics value of this medium. This will account 10 % of total mark.
  • Tests:—-10%
  • Quiz: will accounts 10% of the total mark
  • Final examination: a written final examination will be administered at the end of the course. This will account for 50 % of your total mark.
  • Reading Materials

The reference materials of this course comprises selected and policy documents

Policy/legal Documents

  • The FDRE Constitution,1995
  • The FDRE Nationality Law, 2003
  • Criminal Code of Ethiopia, 2005
  • Civil Code
  • Election Law (the Revised one)
  • Investment Code (revised)
  • Ethics and Anti-corruption Law
  • ADLI, PASDEP,
  • Law of Civil Societies and NGOs
  • Establishing Proclamations of Human Rights Commissions, and Ombudsman Institution
  • International Human Rights Declarations and Conventions accepted by Ethiopia
  • Policies and Strategies on Education and Training of the FDRE
  • Ethical Codes of each Profession like Business ethics, medical ethics, legal ethics, public relations ethics, media ethics etc.,

Note: Some important and highly relevant parts of the above documents must be attached with the teaching material of Civics and Ethics common course as appendices.

Books

  1. Fasil Nahum. (1997). Constitution for the Nation of Nations: the Ethiopian Prospect. Asmara: The Red Sea Press.
    1. Kinfe Abraham. (2004). Ethiopia: From Empire to Federation. Addis Ababa: EIIPD Press: Merara
    1. Guidina.(2003).Competing Ethnic Nationalism: Quest for Democracy 1960-2000.Chamber Printing House: Addis Ababa
    1. Johari, J.C. (1987).Principle of Politics. New Delhi: Stirling Publishers.
    1. Roskin, MG and et al. (1994). Political science: An Introduction. New Jersey: Engelwood Cliffs.

Approval sheet

—————————–                                                                       ———————–

Instructor’s name                                                                                     Signature

—————————–                                                                        ————————-

Module coordinator’s name                                                                       Signature

——————-                                                                                      ————————-

Program coordinator’s name                                                                      Signature

Course Title:   Introduction to Logic

Course Code:      Phil 311     

Credit hours:   3

 Rationale:

The justification for offering this course to the students of Theatre Arts is in order to expose the students to traditional philosophical problems in way that helps them define and shape their own ways and to help them in their understanding of some issues in rational and scientific thought.

 Course Description:

The course tells students what philosophy is.  The course will be approached not from the view of advocating a particular type of doctrine. Thus, all the major areas of philosophy including history of philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and logic will be covered.

 Course Objectives:

 After completion of this course student will be able to:

·   Identify the meaning and sub fields of philosophy

· To point out the word philosophy is made to cover at the present day

· To explain the nature of reflective thinking and to show how it differs from common thought and from the specialized science

· To show the nature of the study of philosophy and to give some practical admonitions on the spirit and method.

Course content:

Chapter One: Introduction

   Meaning and value of philosophy

    Fields of philosophy

   Philosophy, religion and science

Chapter Two: Views of Human Nature

2.1 The rational view

2.2 The religious view

2.3 Scientific view

2.4 existentialist view

Chapter three: Social Philosophy

3.1 Justice

3.1.1 Merit

      3.1.2 Social Utility

      3.1.3 Equality

3.2 Justification of the State

3.3 Government control

3.4 Law and Freedom

Chapter Four: Epistemology—Theory of Knowledge

4.1. Rationalism

4.2. Empiricism

4.3  Phenomenalism

Chapter five: Metaphysics

5.1 Reality as a matter

5.2 Reality as non-matter

5.3 Reality as being

Chapter Six: Logic

6.1. The three law of thought

6.2 The Nature of Argument

            6.1.1. What is argument?

            6.1.2. Types of argument: Deductive and inductive argument

            6.1.3. Validity and invalidity: truth and falsity

            6.1.4. Sound and unsound argument

            6.1.5. Strength and weakness: truth and falsity

            6.1.6. Cogent and uncogent argument

6.3. Fallacies

Chapter Seven: Philosophy and Art

Methodology:

·        Lecture

·        Discussions

Evaluation:

·                Assignments and tests…………………….50%

·                Final exam…………………………………50%

References:

Augustine (1958).  The City of God: Grarden City: Doubleday and company inc.

Barry, Vincent (1983). Philosophy: A text with readings. California: Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Baitery, Cyril (1961), The Greek Atomists and Epicurus . New York: Russell, and Russell, Inc.

Burnet, John (1958), Early Greek Philosophy. Cleveland: The World Publishing Company,

__________ (1962). Greek Philosophy: Tales to Plato. New York: St. Martinis press, inc,

Corn ford, F.M (1960). Before and After Socrates . New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hoffding, Hardal. (1924).  History of modern philosophy, New York: Dover publication, Inc,  two vols.

Mekeon, Richard (ed): Medieval Philosophers, Charler Seibenen

Miller, Ed, (1984). Questions that matter: An Invitation to Philosophy. New York: McGraw – Hill Book Company.

Melchert, Normat (1995): The Great Conversation: A Historical introduction to philosophy. Mayfield Publishing Company, California, 2nd ed,

Stumpf, Samuel E, (1983): Philosophy: History and Problems, New York: Mcgraw – Hill Book Company. (3rd year)

Wideband, Wilhelm. (1965). History of Ancient Philosophy. Dover publication, Inc, New York

________________. (1955), History of Philosophy. New York: Har Pen & row, Publisher